March 21, 2020

Another online guide to using Zoom...

...from law professor Josh Blackman (South Texas).

(Thanks to Paul Horwitz for the pointer.)


March 21, 2020 in Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice | Permalink

March 18, 2020

All U.S. law schools have now moved to online instruction...

March 14, 2020

92% of law school have moved to remote teaching due to coronavirus

Blog Emperor Caron has the details.


March 14, 2020 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice | Permalink

March 09, 2020

What is your law school doing in response to the impending coronavirus pandemic?

This is an open thread for law faculty to post about what their schools are doing:  e.g., cancelling classes, "remote" teaching or exams, cancelling conferences, prohibiting faculty work-related travel etc.   Feel free to link to public resources/statements by your schools.  Submit your comment only once, they are moderated, and may take awhile to appear.


March 9, 2020 in Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice, Student Advice | Permalink | Comments (4)

February 10, 2020

Who controls a journal: the editorial board or the publisher?

The entire editorial board of the European Law Journal has resigned in a dispute with publisher, Wiley, over who the new editors will be.   Legally, it looks like Wiley can appoint the editors, but the credibility of the journal is now shattered.

(Thanks to Matt Kramer for the pointer.)


February 10, 2020 in Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice | Permalink

February 06, 2020

The need for standards governing the correction of errors in digital publications

Professor Janet Sinder (Brooklyn) discusses.


February 6, 2020 in Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice | Permalink

February 03, 2020

"Academic feeder judges"

This is useful, from Professor Howard Wasserman (Florida International University).  Note that it includes judges who are no longer on the bench, as well as many who still are.


February 3, 2020 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Professional Advice, Rankings | Permalink

January 30, 2020

Rostron & Levit's guide to submitting to law reviews updated

Their message follows:

Dear Colleagues,

We  just updated our charts about law journal submissions, expedites, and rankings from different sources for the Spring 2020 submission season covering the 203 main journals of each law school. 

We have created hyperlinks for each law review to take you directly to the law review’s submissions page. Again the chart includes as much information as possible about what law reviews are not accepting submissions right now and what months they say they’ll resume accepting submissions. 

There has been some change in law reviews’ submission preferences:  Now 74 schools prefer or require Scholastica as the exclusive avenue for submissions (15 more say Scholastica or email), 42 law journals prefer direct emails, and 10 law reviews prefer or require submission through ExpressO (19 more say ExpressO or email), with 13 accepting articles submitted through either ExpressO or Scholastica, and 22 accepting through ExpressO, Scholastica, or email. Seven schools now have their own online web portals.  Four schools have an all-symposia format. (This adds up to more than 203, because several of the schools with an all-symposia format welcome symposia proposals.

Continue reading


January 30, 2020 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Professional Advice | Permalink

January 22, 2020

An open letter regarding a controversial tenure decision at USC Law

The letter is here, and includes many prominent signatories (the letter is accepting more signatories as well).  The case concerns Shmuel Leshem, who was denied tenure in 2013; the controversy concerns the solicitation and use of confidential journal referee reports as part of the tenure process.  I would agree, for the reasons given in the letter, that that is not a proper use of such referee reports.  I do not know what role they played in the adverse tenure decision at USC, but the fact that they were even solicited and considered is surprising.


January 22, 2020 in Faculty News, Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice | Permalink

December 17, 2019

Other things to think about if you have multiple tenure track offers (Michael Simkovic)

Brian Leiter has an extremely helpful post about things that entry level candidates should think about when they receive a tenure track offer.  The post below is meant to supplement Brian’s post with additional considerations that are relevant to candidates who are fortunate enough to receive multiple tenure track offers.  It may also be of interest to tenured faculty who have offers to lateral to another institution, and to those deciding between a research faculty position and an outside option such as private practice or public service. 

The institution where you start your academic career as a faculty member is most likely where you will end it, if you are fortunate enough to earn tenure.  Only around 1 to 2 percent of tenured law faculty members per year move between institutions.[1]  It is also relatively rare for academics to return to the full-time practice of law after years in the academy.  Every job move is a high-stakes decision, because every move will most likely be your last.

Summary:

  • Check the Institution’s Financial Condition and Creditworthiness
  • Consider the Institution’s Commitment to Research
  • Consider the Institution’s Competitive Position
  • Consider your Colleagues
  • Consider both the Cost & Quality of Living
  • Consider the Ease of Expected Travel

 

Check the Institution’s Financial Condition and Creditworthiness

Tenure is not an iron clad guarantee of future employment.  Tenure is only as good as the financial strength of the educational institution that stands behind it. Moreover, important considerations like research funding and the availability of raises (or even COLAs) are likely to be a function of the financial position of the institution as well as your own performance.

There are two helpful external sources you can consult:

  • credit rating agencies such as Moody’s, S&P, and/or Fitch,[2]and
  • market-based indictors like bond yield spreads for universities that have debt.

Note that credit ratings will likely be of the university as a whole, not specifically of the law school (bond spreads may reference the university as well), but this is nevertheless useful because the financial strength of the overall university often affects its law school, particularly when either the law school or the university experiences a downturn.

Credit ratings do not track U.S. News rankings as closely as you might expect.[3]  In addition to providing important information about an institution’s overall credit rating, rating agencies’ reports will discuss risk factors such as a disproportionately large share of revenue coming from a single line of business, demographic changes in the region, or competition from other universities.

You should also be mindful of the impact that state and local government politics can have on public institutions and on private institutions that either depend on public institutions as feeder schools or compete with them for students to attend graduate programs.

In some states, public institutions have good relationships with both political parties.  In others, one or both political parties may be planning to cut education funding per student.  Figure out the lay of the land before you move across the country.

The institution’s creditworthiness is also relevant to your retirement savings options. Many universities offer deferred compensation arrangements which enable employees to effectively double their tax-advantaged retirement savings compared to a 403(b) plan alone.  These savings plans permit employees to select investments like a 403(b) or 401(k).  However, unlike a 403(b) or 401(k), deferred compensation plans do not provide for a segregated pool of assets that individual employees own.  Instead, employees who defer their compensation become general unsecured creditors of the university and are owed the account balance.  Other creditors would have claims on the same assets if the university were to become insolvent, and not everyone would be paid in full.

To fully take advantage of these retirement savings options as a young professor, you need to be confident that your university will remain creditworthy for the next 50 to 60 years.

Similarly, some public universities offer defined benefit pensions, but the value of these promises depends on how well-funded the pension is and the financial strength of the state government and/or university system.  States routinely underfund their public pensions.  States and municipalities facing inadequate revenues—typically because of limited political appetite for tax increases or concerns about mobility of taxpayers—have in the past restructured their pensions to make benefits less generous, and may do so again in the future. 

The public pension you are promised may only be worth some number of cents on the dollar, with the number of cents depending on which state you happen to be located in.

You can also consult publicly available financial reports for the university and, if available, for the law school going back five to ten years.  You may also be able to obtain information about the financial condition of the law school by asking the dean questions such as what the endowment is, debt and asset levels, how much “tax” the law school pays to the central university, what kind of support the law school enjoys from the central administration, etc.  However, be aware that Deans, like CEOs, are frequently optimistic in their views of the institutions they run.

Continue reading


December 17, 2019 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Guest Blogger: Michael Simkovic, Professional Advice | Permalink