August 13, 2019

Chicago Alumni and Fellows on the law teaching market, 2019-20

MOVING TO FRONT FROM AUGUST 7

This post is strictly for schools that expect to do hiring this year.

In order to protect the privacy of our candidates, please e-mail me at bleiter@uchicago.edu to get a copy of the narrative profiles of our candidates, including hyperlinks to their homepages.  All these candidates will be in the first FAR distribution.

We have an excellent group of nine candidates this year (four alumni, three Bigelows, one Olin Fellow in Law & Economics, and one Dickerson Fellow), who cover many curricular areas including legal profession/professional responsibility, election law, civil procedure, constitutional law, administrative law, legislation, evidence, employment discrimination, race and the law, contracts, consumer law and finance, property, law & economics, empirical legal studies, corporate law and finance, securities regulation, international trade law, international business transactions, bankruptcy, commercial law, alternative dispute resolution, Chinese law, torts, energy law, anti-discrimination law, law & psychology, experimental jurisprudence, and bioethics.

Our candidates include former Supreme Court and federal appellate clerks; Law Review editors; JD/PhDs in Psychology, Finance, Economics, Sociology and Political Science, as well as SJDs; and accomplished practitioners as well as scholars.  All have publications, sometimes multiple publications, and all have writing samples available upon request.

If when you e-mail, you tell me a bit about your hiring needs, I can supply some more information about all these candidates, since we have vetted them all at some point in the recent past.


August 13, 2019 in Faculty News | Permalink

August 12, 2019

A memorable commencement address

Many readers will, I think, enjoy the commencement address to the Law School's Class of 2019 delivered by my colleague David Weisbach.  At the preceding link, you'll find a transcript and also a link to a video of the talk.  It produced a spontaneous standing ovation, a first in the history of commencement addresses at Chicago as far as anyone can recall.


August 12, 2019 in Faculty News, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

August 06, 2019

Ten lateral moves that made law professors take notice during 2018-19

Based on my in-box and conversations with others, these were the ten moves this past year that were thought to be the biggest hiring coups (I omit any lateral moves my school was part of!):

 

*Albert Choi (law & economics, contracts, corporate) from the University of Virginia to the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

 

*Danielle Citron (privacy, civil rights, freedom of expression, Internet law) from the University of Maryland to Boston University.

 

*G. Marcus Cole (bankruptcy, law & economics) from Stanford University to the University of Notre Dame (to become Dean).

 

*Jonah Gelbach (law & economics, civil procedure, empirical legal studies) from the University of Pennsylvania to the University of California, Berkeley.

 

*David Grewal (international trade, law & technology, political economy, political theory) from Yale University to the University of California, Berkeley.

 

*Orin Kerr (criminal procedure, computer crime law) from the University of Southern California to the University of California, Berkeley.

 

*Catherine Kim (civil procedure, administrative and immigration law) from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill to Brooklyn Law School.

 

*David S. Law (comparative constitutional law, law & social science) from Washington University, St. Louis to the University of California, Irvine.

 

*Rachel Moran (education law, civil rights, race & the law) from the University of California, Los Angeles to the University of California, Irvine.

*Patricia J. Williams (critical race theory, civil rights) from Columbia University to Northeastern University.


August 6, 2019 in Faculty News | Permalink

July 24, 2019

Amy Wax, again, and academic freedom and the duties of administrators

Penn's Amy Wax has done it again, and this time her Dean has caved into those (reasonably) offended and condemned the substance of her remarks.  In the past, Penn Dean Ruger did the right things when it came to Wax, but in this instance he failed:  it is not the job of a Dean to condemn the protected and lawful speech of faculty members.  (See this for more details about my views on this score.)   The public response should have been succinct and consisted only of this:  "Professor Wax speaks for herself, not for the institution."   Individual faculty are free to exercise their speech rights to criticize Wax's latest stupidity, but the institution, for whom the Dean speaks, should remain silent. Here is how the University of Chicago's 1967 Kalven Report (authored by famed First Amendment scholar Harry Kalven) puts it:

The mission of the university is the discovery, improvement, and dissemination of knowledge.  Its domain of inquiry and scrutiny includes all aspects and all values of society.  A university faithful to its mission will provide enduring challenges to social values, policies, practices, and institutions.  By design and effect, it is the institution which creates discontent with the existing social arrangements and proposes new ones.  In brief, a good university, like Socrates, will be upsetting.

The instrument of dissent and criticism is the individual faculty member or the individual student.  The university is the home and sponsor of critics; it is not itself the critic.....To perform its mission in the society, a university must sustain an extraordinary environment of freedom of inquiry, and maintain an independence from political fashions, passions, and pressures.  A university, if it is to be true to its faith in intellectual inquiry, must embrace, be hospitable to, and encourage the widest diversity of views within its own community....

Since the university is a community only for these limited and distinctive purposes, it is a community which cannot take collective action on the issues o fthe day without endangering the conditions for its existence and effectiveness.


July 24, 2019 in Faculty News, Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice | Permalink

July 23, 2019

HLS professor Bruce Hay's nightmare

I doubt anyone could have made this story up, it's bizarre beyond belief.


July 23, 2019 in Faculty News | Permalink

July 22, 2019

Lateral hires with tenure or on tenure-track, 2018-19

I EXPECT THIS WILL BE THE LAST TIME THIS LIST IS MOVED TO THE FRONT FOR 2018-19

These are non-clinical appointments that will take effect in 2019 (except where noted); I will move the list to the front at various intervals as new additions come in.   (Recent additions are in bold.)  Last year's list is here.  Feel free to e-mail me with news of additions to this list.

 

*Sarah Adams-Schoen (land use, ocean & coastal law) from the University of Arkansas, Little Rock to the University of Oregon (untenured lateral).

 

*Jane Aiken (torts, evidence, experiential education) from Georgetown University to Wake Forest University (to become Dean).

 

*Mehrsa Baradaran (banking law, bankruptcy) from the University of Georgia to the University of California, Irvine.

 

*Kristen Barnes (property, housing law, international human rights, voting rights) from the University of Akron to Syracuse University. 

 

*Michael F. Barry (complex litigation, legal education & pedagogy) from St. Mary's University to South Texas College of Law (to become Dean and President).

 

*Valena E. Beety (criminal law & procedure) from West Virginia University to Arizona State University.

 

*Matt Blaze (computer and network security) from the University of Pennsylvania Department of Computer & Information Sciences to Georgetown University (joint appointment in Law and Computer Science).

 

*Mary Anne Bobinski (health law) from the University of British Columbia to Emory University (to become Dean).

 

*Pamela Bookman (contracts, civil procedure, arbitration) from Temple University to Fordham University (untenured lateral).

 

*Maureen Brady (property, land use, legal history) from the University of Virginia to Harvard University (untenured lateral).

 

*William Wilson Bratton (corporate law) from the University of Pennsylvania (where he will become emeritus) to the University of Miami (effective July 1, 2020).

 

*Khiara Bridges (race & the law, family law, reproductive rights) from Boston University to the University of California, Berkeley.

 

*Neil Buchanan (tax) from George Washington University to the University of Florida, Gainesville.

 

*Michael Cahill (criminal law) from Rutgers University back to Brooklyn Law School (to become Dean).

 

*Richard Chen (contracts, international law & arbitration) from the University of Maine to the University of Hawaii (untenured lateral).

 

*Albert Choi (law & economics, contracts, corporate) from the University of Virginia to the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

 

*Danielle Citron (privacy, civil rights, freedom of expression, Internet law) from the University of Maryland to Boston University.

 

*Zachary Clopton (civil procedure, international business transaction, national security law) from Cornell University to Northwestern University.

 

*G. Marcus Cole (bankruptcy, law & economics) from Stanford University to the University of Notre Dame (to become Dean).

 

*Blanche Cook (criminal law & procedure, evidence, critical race theory) from Wayne State University to the University of Kentucky.

 

*Giuseppe Dari Mattiacci (law & economics, comparative law, corporate law, contracts) from the University of Amsterdam to Columbia University.

 

*Danielle Conway (public procurement law, entrepreneurship, intellectual property) from the University of Maine (where she is Dean) to Pennsylvania State University Dickinson School of Law (to become Dean).

 

*Lincoln Davies (energy law & policy) from the University of Utah to Ohio State University (to become Dean).

 

*Ryan Doerfler (legislation/statutory interpretation, administrative law, law & philosophy) from the University of Pennsylvania to the University of Chicago.

 

*Justin Driver (constitutional law) from the University of Chicago to Yale University.

 

*Trevor Gardner (criminal law) from the University of Washington, Seattle to Washington University, St. Louis (untenured lateral).

 

*Jonah Gelbach (law & economics, civil procedure, empirical legal studies) from the University of Pennsylvania to the University of California, Berkeley.

 

*Marc-Tizoc Gonzalez (property, critical race theory, poverty law) from St. Thomas University (Florida) to the University of New Mexico. 

 

*D. Wendy Greene (employment law, race & law, constitutional law) from Cumberland Law/Samford University to Drexel University.

 

*David Grewal (international trade, law & technology, political economy, political theory) from Yale University to the University of California, Berkeley.

 

*Vinay Harpalani (race & law, education law, constitutional law) from Savannah Law School to the University of New Mexico (untenured lateral).

 

*Jonathan Kahn (health law, bioethics, constitutional law, torts) from Mitchell|Hamline School of Law to Northeastern University.

 

*John Kang (constitutional law, law & gender, legal theory) from St. Thomas University (Florida) to the University of New Mexico.

 

*Orin Kerr (criminal procedure, computer crime law) from the University of Southern California to the University of California, Berkeley.

 

*Catherine Kim (civil procedure, administrative and immigration law) from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill to Brooklyn Law School.

 

*Anita Krug (securities regulation, financial regulation) from the University of Washington, Seattle to Chicago-Kent College of Law/Illinois Institute of Technology (to become Dean).

 

*David S. Law (comparative constitutional law, law & social science) from Washington University, St. Louis to the University of California, Irvine.

 

*Kate Levine (criminal law and procedure) from St. John's University to Cardozo Law School (untenured lateral).

 

*Myrisha Lewis (health law, bioethics, family law) from Howard University to the College of William & Mary (untenured lateral).

 

*Ji Li (Chinese law and politics) from Rutgers University to the University of California, Irvine.

 

*Leah Litman (constitutional law, federal courts) from the University of California, Irvine to the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (untenured lateral).

 

*M. Elizabeth Magill (administrative law, constitutional law) from Stanford University to the University of Virginia (to become Provost).

 

*Andrea Matwyshyn (law & technology, cybersecurity, privacy, intellectual property) from Northeastern University to Pennsylvania State University, University Park (where she will also be founding director of the Policy Innovation Lab of Tomorrow).

 

*James McGrath (legal education & pedagogy, health law) from Texas A&M University to Western Michigan University Cooley Law School (to become President and Dean).

 

*Ralf Michaels (comparative law, conflicts of law) from Duke University to the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and Private International Law (Hamburg).

 

*Daniel Morales (immigration law) from DePaul University to the University of Houston.

 

*Rachel Moran (education law, civil rights, race & the law) from the University of California, Los Angeles to the University of California, Irvine.

 

*Minor Myers (corporate law) from Brooklyn Law School to the University of Connecticut, Hartford.

 

Continue reading


July 22, 2019 in Faculty News | Permalink

May 20, 2019

Three law professors elected to American Philosophical Society

They are:  S. James Anaya (Colorado), Annette Gordon-Reed (Harvard), and Patricia Williams (Columbia currently, but moving to Northeastern).


May 20, 2019 in Faculty News | Permalink

May 15, 2019

Entry-level hiring report for 2019

MOVING TO FRONT--ORIGINALLY POSTED MARCH 5

Professor Lawsky (Northwestern) is now collecting information.


May 15, 2019 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Faculty News | Permalink

May 06, 2019

Open letter of support for Prof. Wojciech Sadurski (Sydney)

Professor Sadurski, a leading legal theorist and scholar of constitutionalism, has been a vigorous and penetrating critic of the reactionary and authoritarian "Law and Justice" party in Poland ("PiS" is the Polish acronym); he has now become the target of both civil and criminal legal actions attempting to silence him.  The open letter is here, and they are accepting additional signatories in the comments.


May 6, 2019 in Faculty News, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

May 01, 2019

Top 10 Corporate & Securities Articles of 2018

From Professor Thompson's website at Georgetown (I've added institutional affiliations):

The Corporate Practice Commentator is pleased to announce the results of its twenty-fifth annual poll to select the ten best corporate and securities articles.  Teachers in corporate and securities law were asked to select the best corporate and securities articles from a list of articles published and indexed in legal journals during 2018.  Just short of 400 articles were on this year’s list.  Because of the vagaries of publication, indexing, and mailing, some articles published in 2018 have a 2017 date, and not all articles containing a 2018 date were published and indexed in time to be included in this year’s list.

The articles, listed in alphabetical order of the initial author, are:

Yakov Amihud (NYU Business), Markus Schmid (St. Gallen) & Steven Davidoff Solomon (Berkeley).  Settling the Staggered Board Debate.  166 U. Pa. L. Rev. 1475-1510 (2018).

Tamara Belinfanti (New York Law School) & Lynn Stout (late of Cornell).  Contested Visions: The Value of Systems Theory for Corporate Law.  166 U. Pa. L. Rev. 578-631 (2018).

James D. Cox (Duke) & Randall S. Thomas (Vanderbilt).  Delaware’s Retreat: Exploring Developing Fissures and Tectonic Shifts in Delaware Corporate Law.  42 Del. J. Corp. L. 323-389 (2018).

Jill E. Fisch (Penn).  Governance by Contract: The Implications for Corporate Bylaws.  106 Cal. L. Rev. 373-409 (2018).

Jill E. Fisch (Penn), Jonah B. Gelbach (Penn, moving to Berkeley) & Jonathan Klick (Penn).  The Logic and Limits of Event Studies in Securities Fraud Litigation.  96 Tex. L. Rev. 553-618 (2018).

George S. Geis (Virginia).  Traceable Shares and Corporate Law.  113 Nw. U. L. Rev. 227-277 (2018).

Cathy Hwang (Utah).  Deal Momentum.  65 UCLA L. Rev. 376-425 (2018).

Dorothy S. Lund (Southern California).  The Case against Passive Shareholding Voting.  43 J. Corp. L. 493-536 (2018).

Edward B. Rock & Daniel L. Rubinfeld (both NYU).  Antitrust for Institutional Investors.  82 Antitrust L. J. 221-78 (2018).

Mark J. Roe (Harvard).  Stock-Market Short-Termism’s Impact.  167 U. Pa. L. Rev. 71-121 (2018).


May 1, 2019 in Faculty News, Rankings | Permalink