May 17, 2021

Lawsky's Entry-Level Hiring Report for 2021

Although Professor Lawsky will continue to update the report, an initial version is here.  A few notable results:

*There were 64 rookie hires, down from 88 last year.

*There were only 45 schools hiring, down from 66 last year.

*All rookie hires had some combination of a clerkship, a fellowship, and/or an advanced degree.  If I'm reading the data rightly, only one candidate got hired with only a clerkship.  88% of those hired had done a fellowship, and 45% of those hired had a PhD.


May 17, 2021 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Faculty News | Permalink

Entry-level hiring report: today is the last day to submit information...

May 06, 2021

AALS cancels fall 2021 in-person hiring convention ("the meat market")

Here.   The AALS also cancelled last fall's in-person hiring convention for the obvious reasons. 

What this means for academic jobs seekers is that they have to be ready to do screening interviews (via Zoom) within a week or two of the FAR forms being released next August 18 (forms will be due before that of course).  It will also mean that the hiring "season" will have a less predictable timetable, with many callbacks in September and October and offers before Thanksgiving likely.  That happened last year too, but a countervailing force was that many law schools entered the market quite late in 2020-21, as it became clearer that the pandemic might end and that enrollments (and thus income) were shaping up favorably:  as a result, many hiring schools did not enter the market until early 2021. 

2021-22 promises to be an excellent year for law school enrollments, and early indicators suggest that the 2022-23 year will be at least as strong.  Since enrollments drive hiring at 80-85% of the law schools in the country, this bodes very well for academic job seekers.   I expect many more law schools to be in the market for new teachers this coming year, compared to this past year.  (This past year, 1 in 5 tenure-track jobs weren take by Chicago alums and/or Fellows.  Needless to say, we hope that will continue, and we appreciate the strong interest in law schools in our graduates and Fellows.)   I doubt we'll get back to the pre-2010 levels of hiring (when 150+ new faculty were hired each year), but I would not be surprised if next year saw 100 or so new faculty hired.

ADDENDUM:   A colleague elsewhere points out to me a possible countervailing consideration:  namely, uncertainty about whether foreign LLMs will be able to come to the US next year for their degrees.  LLM enrollment is a significant source of tuition revenue at many schools.  My guess is that a majority of foreign LLM students will be able to enter the country for purposes of study.


May 6, 2021 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers | Permalink

April 05, 2021

9th Circuit's Equal Pay Act decision could have ramifications for retention offers to faculty

MOVING TO FRONT FROM MARCH 18--APOLOGIES FOR THE DELAY IN APPROVING COMMENTS; MORE WELCOME

Blog Emperor Caron excerpts the relevant parts of the decision.   To put it simply:  if Professor Male turns down an offer from Harvard for an extra 40k in salary, Professor Female (in the same department, doing the same general kind of work, who previously had been paid the same as Professor Male) may have an equal pay claim even if she never got a Harvard offer.   Thoughts from experts on these issues?  Do I misunderstand the potential import of the decision?  Submit your comment only once, it may take awhile to appear.


April 5, 2021 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Faculty News, Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice | Permalink | Comments (2)

March 15, 2021

The big increase in applicants to law schools this year (and the big increase in high-end LSAT scores)

Informative piece at the ABA Journal.  This bodes very well for the law teaching market in 2021-22, as does the impending end of the pandemic.  I wouldn't be surprised if next academic year more than 100 new tenure-track faculty were hired, a figure we haven't seen in a decade.


March 15, 2021 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice | Permalink

March 02, 2021

Entry-level hiring report for 2021

Professor Lawsky (Northwestern) is now collecting the information; if you've accepted a tenure-track law teaching job this year, please submit your data there.


March 2, 2021 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Faculty News | Permalink

February 02, 2021

Rostron & Levit update their invaluable guide to submitting to law reviews

They write:

 

We  just updated our charts about law journal submissions, expedites, and rankings from different sources for the Spring 2021 submission season covering the 199 main journals of each law school.   

We have created hyperlinks for each law review to take you directly to the law review’s submissions page. Again the chart includes as much information as possible about what law reviews are not accepting submissions right now and what months they say they’ll resume accepting submissions.

Washington and Lee has changed its methodology on law review statistics.  Now Washington and Lee only ranks the top 400 law review (many of which are specialty journals, online supplements, etc.), so not all flagship journals are now ranked by them.  But we put in the data for those that are ranked.  [BL comment:  the W&L data is junk, ignore it]

Continue reading


February 2, 2021 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Of Academic Interest, Rankings | Permalink

January 08, 2021

Dickerson Fellowship at the University of Chicago Law School

November 05, 2020

Two big changes in hiring for law teaching jobs over the last decade

In my conversation with Professor Kerr awhile back, I said there were two, but we ended up discussing only one:  namely, the way in which a PhD or VAP/Fellowship has now become almost essential for being hired.  The other big change that I've observed over the last ten years has been the dramatic increase in hiring driven by "diversity" considerations (I dislike the "diversity" label for reasons discussed here).  Some context:  I have been working with candidates on the law teaching job market since the late 1990s, first at the University of Texas, then at the University of Chicago since 2008.  I've worked by now with 150+ candidates for nearly 25 years of hiring seasons. 

It has been the case for quite some time that "diverse" candidates got more interviews than comparable non-diverse candidates, but often one worried that schools were just trying to fulfill their equal opportunity obligations by making sure their slate of interviews was "diverse."  But what has changed during the last decade is that "diverse" candidates are getting hired far more often than before, and hired at stronger schools.  The job market for "diverse" candidates for law teaching positions has never been more favorable than it is now.


November 5, 2020 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Faculty News, Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

November 03, 2020

Law school applicants up more than a third so far this year...

...which will bode well for law school faculty hiring next year, and may even lead some schools to invest this year in new faculty.   Given the tight job market for college grads, it may also be that more college seniors have decided to apply to law school already.  If economic conditions brighten, some of them may turn out to forego a law school spot.  We'll see what the pool looks like after January (and assuming the monster-child in the White House is replaced).


November 3, 2020 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest | Permalink