Wednesday, July 28, 2021

Lateral hires with tenure or on tenure-track, 2020-21

These are non-clinical appointments that will take effect in 2021 (except where noted); I will move the list to the front at various intervals as new additions come in.   (Recent additions are in bold.)  Last year's list is here.  Feel free to e-mail me with news of additions to this list.

 

*Atinuke Adediran (legal profession, law & social science) from Boston College to Fordham University (untenured lateral).

 

*Aziza Ahmed (health law, constitutional law, gender/race & law) from Northeastern University to the University of California, Irvine.

 

*Ifeoma Ajunwa (law & technology, race & law, labor & employment law, health law) from Cornell University (Industrial & Labor Relations School) to the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (effective January 2021).

 

*Alena Allen (health law, torts, feminist legal theory) from University of Memphis to University of Arkansas, Fayetteville.

 

*Kate Andrias (labor, administrative & constitutional law) from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor to Columbia University.

 

*Shyamkrishna Balganesh (intellectual property, private law theory) from the University of Pennsylvania to Columbia University (effective January 2021).

 

*Jordan Barry (corporate & securities law, tax, law & economics) from the University of San Diego to the University of Southern California.

 

*Susan Bisom-Rapp (international and comparative employment law, labor law, employment discrimination) from Thomas Jefferson School of Law to California Western School of Law.
*Maggie Blackhawk (legislation, constitutional law, federal Indian law) from the University of Pennsylvania to New York University.

 

*Curtis A. Bradley (international law, foreign affairs law, federal courts) from Duke University to the University of Chicago.

 

*Sara Bronin (property, land use, historic preservation, energy law) from the University of Connecticut to Cornell University (College of Architecture, Art & Planning, and Assocated Faculty in the Law School).

 

*John R. Brooks (tax law & policy) from Georgetown University to Fordham University (starting fall 2022).

 

*Jay Butler (international business transactions, corporate law) from the College of William & Mary to the University of Virginia.

 

*Nancy Chi Cantalupo (civil rights, human rights, sex discrimination) from California Western School of Law to Wayne State University (untenured lateral).

 

*Jennifer Chacon (immimgration law, constitutional law, criminal law & procedure) from the University of California, Los Angeles to the University of California, Berkeley.

 

*Guy-Uriel Charles (constitutional law, election law, race & law) from Duke University to Harvard University.

 

*Vincent Chiao (criminal law & procedure, legal theory, political philosophy) from the University of Toronto to the University of Richmond.

 

*Danielle Citron (privacy, civil rights, freedom of expression, Internet law) from Boston University to the University of Virginia (effective January 2021).

 

*Kimberly Clausing (public finance, tax, international trade) from Reed College (Economics) to the University of California, Los Angeles.

 

*Amy Cohen (ADR, mediation, property, law & development) from Ohio State University to Temple University.

 

*Robin Kundis Craig (environmental law, water law) from the University of Utah to the University of Southern California.

 

*Colin Crawford (environmental law, land use) from the University of Louisville (where he is Dean) to Golden Gate University (to become Dean).

 

*John Czarnetzky (bankruptcy, corporate) from the University of Mississippi to Ave Maria School of Law (to become Dean).

 

*Meera Deo (legal education, race & law, law & society) from Thomas Jefferson Law School to Southwestern School of Law.

 

*Darby Dickerson (legal writing) from UIC John Marshall Law School (where she is Dean) to Southwestern Law School (to become Dean).

 

*Stephanie Holmes Didwania (criminal law & procedure, intellectual property, empirical legal studies, law & economics) from Temple University to University of Wisconsin, Madison (untenured lateral).

 

*Deborah Dinner (legal history, employment discrimination, family law) from Emory University to Cornell University.

 

*Tonya Evans (intellectual property, trusts & estates, entertainment law) from the University of New Hampshire to Pennsylania State University-Dickinson School of Law.

 

*Lisa Fairfax (corporate, securities) from George Washington University to the University of Pennsylvania.

 

*Roger A. Fairfax, Jr. (criminal law & procedure, criminal justice administration) from George Washington University to American University (to become Dean).

 

*Joseph Fishkin (constitutional law, employment discrimination, election law, equal opportunity) from the University of Texas, Austin to the University of California, Los Angeles.

 

*Pamela Foohey (bankruptcy, commercial law, consumer law) from Indiana University, Bloomington to Cardozo Law School/Yeshiva University.

 

*Cynthia Fountaine (civil rights, civil procedure, federal courts) from Southern Illinois University, Carbondale to the University of North Texas.

 

*Cary Franklin (constitutional law, antidiscrimination law, legal history) from the University of Texas, Austin to the University of California, Los Angeles.

 

*César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández (criminal law, immigration law) from the University of Denver to Ohio State University.

 

*Jonathan Glater (education law & policy, disability law) from the University of California, Los Angeles to the University of California, Berkeley.

 

*Kevin Greene (intellectual property, entertainment law) from Thomas Jefferson School f Law to Southwestern Law School (effective January 2021).

 

*Linda Greene (constitutional law, civil rights, sports law) from the University of Wisconsin, Madison to Michigan State University (to become Dean).

 

*Caleb Griffin (corporate law, contracts) from Belmont University to University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (untenured lateral).

 

*G. Mitu Gulati (contracts, sovereign debt, law & economics, empirical legal studies, race/gender & law) from Duke University to the University of Virginia.

 

*Jasmine E. Harris (law & inequality, disability law, evidence) from the University of California, Davis to the University of Pennsylvania.

 

*Ran Hirschl (comparative constitutional law) from the University of Toronto to the University of Texas, Austin (joint with Government Department).

 

*Darren Hutchinson (civil rights, law & inequality, critical race theory) from the University of Florida, Gainesville to Emory University.

 

*Lolita Buckner Inniss (legal history, gender & law, critical race theory) from Southern Methodist University to the University of Colorado, Boulder (to become Dean).

 

*Jason Iuliano (contracts, commercial law, consumer law) from Villanova University to the University of Utah (untenured lateral).

 

*Osamudia James (administrative law, race & law, education law) from the University of Miami to the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

 

*Jamila Jefferson-Jones (property, real estate transactions, housing law) from the University of Missouri-Kansas City to Wayne State University.  

 

*Kristin Johnson (financial regulation, securities regulation) from Tulane University to Emory University (effective January 2021).

 

*Michael J. Kaufman (civil procedure, education law) from Loyola University, Chicago (where he is Dean) to Santa Clara University (to become Dean).

 

*Melvin Kelley (property, fair housing, critical race theory) from Villanova University to Northeastern University (untenured lateral).

 

*Madhav Khosla (Indian constitutional law, comparative constitutional law) from Ashoka University (India) to Columbia University (untenured lateral, effective January 1, 2022).

 

*Nancy Kim (law & technology, contracts, commercial law) from California Western School of Law to Chicago-Kent College of Law/Illinois Institute of Technology.

 

*Ariel Jurow Kleiman (tax) from the University of San Diego to Loyola Law School, Los Angeles.

 

*Craig Konnoth (health law, law & sexuality) from the University of Colorado, Boulder to the University of Virginia.

 

*Kimberly Krawiec (corporate) from Duke University to the University of Virginia.

 

*Anita Krishnakumar (legislation and statutory interpretation) from St. John's University to Georgetown University.

 

*Guha Krishnamurthi (criminal law & procedure, constitutional law, jurisprudence) from South Texas College of Law to the University of Oklahoma, Norman (untenured lateral).

 

*Margaret Kwoka (administrative law, civil procedure, federal courts) from the University of Denver to Ohio State University.

 

*David S. Law (comparative constitutional law, law & social science) from the University of California, Irvine to the University of Virginia.

 

*Stacy Leeds (Federal Indian law) from the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville to Arizona State University (effective January 2021).

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July 28, 2021 in Faculty News | Permalink

Monday, July 26, 2021

Do academic norms and politics mix? The case of Richard W. Painter (UPDATED)

Prior to last week, I'd never had (to my recollection) any interaction with Professor Richard Painter of the University of Minnesota, a moderately well-known expert on corporate law and legal ethics.  As some readers will recall, Professor Painter had the dubious distinction of agreeing to serve as the White House ethics lawyer for George W. Bush in 2005-2007 (i.e., after the unlawful war of aggression against Iraq).   But in more recent years, he's been on the side of the angels, crusading against corruption in the Trump Administration.  In 2018, he entered electoral politics, running against the incumbent Senator Smith in Minnesota in the primary, albeit losing by a large margin.

For reasons unknown to me, on July 22, Professor Painter called attention to a blog post of mine from February of this year regarding the controversy over Professor Mark Ramseyer's revisionist view of Japan's use of "comfort women" during WWII, which appeared in the peer-reviewed International Review of Law & Economics.  Professor Ramseyer's article has been subjected to severe criticism by other scholars.  That is how academic life and academic freedom works:   scholars get to publish their views, and other scholars get to respond.  Scholars also get to be wrong, including seriously wrong.  The hard question raised by L'Affaire Ramseyer is how, consistent with academic freedom and scholarly norms, we make decisions to retract after peer-reviewed publication.  My view, expressed in the earlier post, is that the standard for retraction should be intentional wrongdoing, such as fraud.  (Plagiarism, intentional or otherwise, should also be grounds for retraction as well, since it can be clearly established in any case that warrants retraction.)  The reason is fairly obvious:  every scholarly dispute could be turned into a demand for retraction absent the higher bar I propose. And in that world, publication after peer review would not mean very much.

In any case, Professor Painter was livid, not only at the "shocking arrogance" of one of the editors of the journal that published Ramseyer's article (Penn's Jonathan Klick), but at law & economics scholars and game theorists generally (and again)!  He declared that the editor who accepted Ramseyer's article must be a "sick puppy."  Professor Painter pronounced that, "Neither Leiter nor Klick knows what he's talking about. Academic articles with demonstrably false claims are retracted by reputable journals."   He cited no examples, which is not surprising:  outside of articles involving mathematical or calculation mistakes, almost all cases of retraction I have seen involve intentional wrongdoing by the authors (e.g., fabricating evidence or data) or plagiarism.  In addition, very few of the specific claims in Professor Ramseyer's article are "demonstrably false," although the critique linked above raises serious doubts about several of them, about his overall thesis, and about the quality of the scholarship (most of the critiques pertain to the interpretation of evidence, the omission of evidence, cherry-picking evidence, and not to falsehoods per se).  If we credit all the claims of the critics (at this stage, I see no reason not to), Professor Ramseyer's use of evidence was selective, and occasionally quite unreliable; and his citation practices were poor.   These are serious criticisms, but they do not add up to a case for retraction of the article after it passed peer-review:  they warrant published replies and perhaps an erratum for one or two claims that seem clearly misleading given the evidence (e.g., the apparently false claim that the girl Osaki was not deceived by recruiters).  If the criticisms survive scrutiny, Professor Ramseyer's reputation and that of the journal will suffer. 

I had a bit of Twitter back-and-forth with Professor Painter about this on Friday evening July 23, but when it became clear he wasn't being remotely serious (he was even chided by Professor Garrett Epps (Baltimore) for his mocking me as a quote-unquote-moral philosopher), I said "good night" and invited him to get in touch if he wanted to have a serious debate about the norms governing retraction of peer-reviewed articles.  He did not take me up on that offer.

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July 26, 2021 | Permalink

Monday, July 19, 2021

Invitation to participate in "Legal Academy and Theory Survey"

Law professor Kevin Tobia (Georgetown) writes:

I am conducted an anonymous survey, with a graduate student collaborator, to learn more about the legal academy and legal theory. Anyone who self-identifies as a member of the “legal academy” is invited to participate. Participants might include, among others: law professors, fellows, and students; legal practitioners; and scholars from adjacent fields.

The survey has three parts: 1. Demographics; 2. Your views about which areas of law are most “central” in the legal academy; 3. Your views about substantive questions in legal theory. You are invited to take all parts of the study and are welcome to skip any questions, for any reason. The survey has obtained ethical approval and no identifying information will be retained. Detail about the survey construction can be found here. The survey will close on September 1, 2021. Thank you for your help!

To take the survey, follow this link: https://georgetown.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8iYDOpzaQRxjBzw

July 19, 2021 in Of Academic Interest | Permalink

Friday, July 16, 2021

Books by Nobel prize winners to read (or listen to) this summer

One of the great joys of being a student or academic is the ability to engage in self-directed learning.  The freedom this affords can be overwhelming, given the massive volume of books, articles, and other media that could be consumed.  This raises the question, what should be read for pleasure first?

Recently, I've been reading (and listening to audio books) by Nobel prize winners.  There are of course many great books by people who have not won Nobel prizes, and who many never win one (for example, because they work in a field that is not eligible).  But there seem to be few bad books by Nobel prize winners, and so I've been pleased with my selections.*  

I'm including a partial list of books by Nobel prize winners that I've recently enjoyed. 

I encourage others to use the comments section to include books by Nobel prize winners that they've enjoyed. Please only use the comments for this purpose, and please include your real name.

Please also indicate what field the author won the Nobel prize in, and (to your knowledge), whether an audio book version is available.  For purposes of the list below, I am including the Nobel prize in economics and am not counting the Nobel Peace prize, since my interest is in scientists, writers and social scientists rather than politicians. 

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July 16, 2021 in Guest Blogger: Michael Simkovic, Of Academic Interest, Science | Permalink | Comments (3)

Tuesday, July 13, 2021

Cornell Interim Dean Jens David Ohlin named Dean

The Cornell announcement is here.

July 13, 2021 in Faculty News | Permalink

Monday, July 12, 2021

Disability in a post-pandemic world

Law professor Adam Samaha (NYU) writes insightfully about this issue, drawing on his own experience.

July 12, 2021 in Faculty News, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

Thursday, July 8, 2021

Law schools hiring in 2021-22 can announce their committees and hiring priorities...

Monday, July 5, 2021

In Memoriam: Mathew McCubbins (1956-2021)

A leading and influential scholar of the legislative process, Professor McCubbins was, at the time of his death, a professor in both political science and law at Duke University.  The Duke Political Science memorial notice is here.

July 5, 2021 in Memorial Notices | Permalink

Tuesday, June 29, 2021

Summer blogging

I'll be posting less regularly until early August.  Professor Sisk and colleagues at St. Thomas are working on a new scholarly impact study, and I will make time for thost results as they become available.

June 29, 2021 in Navel-Gazing | Permalink