Monday, September 16, 2019

Lateral hires with tenure or on tenure-track, 2019-20

These are non-clinical appointments that will take effect in 2020 (except where noted); I will move the list to the front at various intervals as new additions come in.   (Recent additions are in bold.)  Last year's list is here.  Feel free to e-mail me with news of additions to this list.

Although this is a list of lateral moves, as a point of personal privilege I'd like to report a lateral stay:  it gives me particular pleasure to note that my colleague William Baude (constitutional law and theory) has turned down the offers from Harvard and Stanford Law Schools to remain with us.  With the addition of Ryan Doerfler (law & philosophy, legislation) from Penn last year, as well as existing faculty (like Martha Nussbaum and David Strauss), I feel confident that Chicago now has the strongest philosophically-minded group of public law scholars in the nation.

 

*Mario Biagioli (intellectual property, history of intellectual property, science and technology studies) from the University of California, Davis (Law and Science & Technology Studies) to the University of California, Los Angeles (joint in Law and Communications).

 

*William Wilson Bratton (corporate law) from the University of Pennsylvania (where he will become emeritus) to the University of Miami.

 

*Ali Rod Khadem (Islamic law, business law) from Deakin University to Suffolk University (untenured lateral).

 

*Elizabeth Pollman (corporate law) from Loyola Law School, Los Angeles to the University of Pennsylvania (effective January 2020).

 

*Nicholas Stephanopoulos (election law & voting rights) from the University of Chicago to Harvard University (effective January 2020).

 

*Karen Tani (legal history) from the University of California, Berkeley to the University of Pennsylvania.

September 16, 2019 in Faculty News | Permalink

Friday, September 13, 2019

Employment lawyer with higher ed experience in Minneapolis area?

St. Cloud State University is poised to selectively fire tenured faculty in some targeted programs, pleading financial exigency, but in violation of its own rules and policies for such cases.   If any reader knows of a good employment lawyer in Minnesota, please shoot me an e-mail (bleiter@uchicago.edu):  time is of the essence!  Thanks.

UPDATE:  Many thanks for suggestions from several readers; the faculty member in question  now has legal counsel.

September 13, 2019 | Permalink

Thursday, September 12, 2019

Top 40 law faculties according to readers of the blog

So with 214 votes cast, here are the results; I've added spaces to mark out schools that were "clustered" pretty closely together.

 

1. Yale University  (Condorcet winner: wins contests with all other choices)

2. Harvard University  loses to Yale University by 107–78

 

3. Stanford University  loses to Yale University by 154–33, loses to Harvard University by 153–34

4. University of Chicago  loses to Yale University by 154–37, loses to Stanford University by 96–90

 

5. New York University  loses to Yale University by 157–37, loses to University of Chicago by 105–81

6. Columbia University  loses to Yale University by 177–18, loses to New York University by 102–83

 

7. University of California, Berkeley  loses to Yale University by 184–9, loses to Columbia University by 149–40
8. University of Pennsylvania  loses to Yale University by 183–9, loses to University of California, Berkeley by 95–83
9. University of Virginia  loses to Yale University by 184–7, loses to University of Pennsylvania by 95–77

10. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor  loses to Yale University by 187–7, loses to University of Virginia by 87–86

 

11. Duke University  loses to Yale University by 189–5, loses to University of Michigan, Ann Arbor by 103–69

 

12. Georgetown University  loses to Yale University by 192–4, loses to Duke University by 106–69
13. Northwestern University  loses to Yale University by 189–6, loses to Georgetown University by 90–88
14. Cornell University  loses to Yale University by 189–6, loses to Northwestern University by 89–75

15. University of California, Los Angeles  loses to Yale University by 192–1, loses to Cornell University by 95–79

 

16. University of Texas, Austin  loses to Yale University by 193–0, loses to University of California, Los Angeles by 100–69

 

17. Vanderbilt University  loses to Yale University by 186–1, loses to University of Texas, Austin by 92–63

 

18. University of Southern California  loses to Yale University by 185–0, loses to Vanderbilt University by 99–42

 

19. Washington University, St. Louis  loses to Yale University by 183–0, loses to University of Southern California by 88–52
20. Boston University  loses to Yale University by 185–3, loses to Washington University, St. Louis by 80–67
21. University of California, Irvine  loses to Yale University by 188–1, loses to Boston University by 81–67
22. George Washington University  loses to Yale University by 187–1, loses to University of California, Irvine by 78–70

23. University of Minnesota, Minneapolis-St. Paul  loses to Yale University by 183–0, loses to George Washington University by 75–63

 

24. Emory University  loses to Yale University by 186–1, loses to University of Minnesota, Minneapolis-St. Paul by 78–60
25. University of Notre Dame  loses to Yale University by 180–1, loses to Emory University by 73–69
26. Boston College  loses to Yale University by 180–2, loses to University of Notre Dame by 78–60

27. Fordham University  loses to Yale University by 185–2, loses to Boston College by 73–65

 

28. College of William & Mary  loses to Yale University by 180–2, loses to Fordham University by 73–55
29. University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign  loses to Yale University by 178–0, loses to College of William & Mary by 64–60
30. University of California, Davis  loses to Yale University by 180–0, loses to University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign by 60–57
31. University of Iowa  loses to Yale University by 180–0, loses to University of California, Davis by 70–53
32. University of Wisconsin, Madison  loses to Yale University by 175–0, loses to University of Iowa by 66–57

33. Cardozo Law School/Yeshiva University  loses to Yale University by 174–6, loses to University of Wisconsin, Madison by 67–63

 

34. George Mason University  loses to Yale University by 178–3, loses to Cardozo Law School/Yeshiva University by 72–49
35. Indiana University, Bloomington  loses to Yale University by 172–1, loses to George Mason University by 58–56
36. Ohio State University  loses to Yale University by 173–0, loses to Indiana University, Bloomington by 57–48
37. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill  loses to Yale University by 182–0, loses to Ohio State University by 65–50
38. Arizona State University  loses to Yale University by 173–3, loses to University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill by 65–56
39. Brooklyn Law School  loses to Yale University by 169–6, loses to Arizona State University by 61–57
40. Florida State University  loses to Yale University by 176–1, loses to Brooklyn Law School by 59–56

UC Hastings trailed Florida State by ten votes, and Alabama trailed Hastings by 3 votes.

Unfortunately, this looks a lot like the U.S. News overall rank, which is a nonsense number, although there are notable exceptions:  e.g., NYU coming out ahead of Columbia, but also places like George Mason, Brooklyn, and Florida State (but San Diego not making the top 50 was a sign of the pernicious influence of US News).  You can get an idea of which school's voters tried to get a strategic advantage by ranking their school ahead of Yale, as 6 voters for Brooklyn and Cardozo each did (while only 2 Fordham voters did so).   Condorcet largely washes out that kind of voting, but it may have some effect, I can't say for sure.

What's really needed is a survey that presents evaluators with faculty lists, rather than school names--perhaps down the line!  Or if someone else wants to try it, I can help publicize and/or offer advice.

September 12, 2019 in Rankings | Permalink

Wednesday, September 11, 2019

Justice Thomas's jurisprudence of race

Interesting article, that called to my attention some things I had not known.

September 11, 2019 in Of Academic Interest | Permalink

Tuesday, September 10, 2019

Top 40 Law Faculties in terms of scholarly distinction, 2019 edition

We haven't played this game in awhile, so here it goes:  66 choices in an attempt to find "the top 40".  Don't participate if your knowledge of law schools is limited to what you learned from USNEWS.com.   Only participate if you have an informed opinion about the scholarship these faculties produce.   Feel free to choose "no opinion" for faculties you don't know much about.  And have fun!

September 10, 2019 in Rankings | Permalink

Monday, September 9, 2019

A strange reaction to Professor Kronman's point about diversity

Twitter tends to be a forum for superficial and ill-considered reactions, but this one certainly was striking.  I had written that, while I agreed with Professor Witt about the merits of changing the name of a Yale residential college named after a gross apologist for chattel slavery, I was,

also inclined to agree with Professor Kronman that (as he recently wrote in the Wall Street Journal), “Diversity, as it is understood today…means diversity of race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation. Diversity in this sense is not an academic value. Its origin and aspiration are political [i.e. justice for victims of discrimination]. The demand for ever-greater diversity in higher education is a political campaign masquerading as an educational ideal.”  

In response, Jeffrey Selbin, a clinician at Berkeley's law school, tweeted:

White straight cis male education is apolitical until everyone else wants in. Then, “The demand for ever-greater diversity in higher education is a political campaign masquerading as an educational ideal.“ Seriously?

Of course, no one suggested that during the era when elite institutions systematically discriminated against non-WASPs and women and racial and ethnic minorities that these institutions were apolitical:  far from it, they were devoted to reproducing the class system with a particular racial and ethnic composition.  But none of us were even talking about that era!

Continue reading

September 9, 2019 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

Wednesday, September 4, 2019

Rosenblatt's Deans Database

Lots of information, including a breakdown of Deans by years of service, alma mater, race, gender and more.  (For example, more than one-third of Deans are now women [including the Deans at Yale, Columbia, Stanford, Virginia, Duke, Northwestern, and UCLA, among other places].)

September 4, 2019 in Faculty News, Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

Tuesday, September 3, 2019

Yale Civil War: Witt v. Kronman

Legal historian John Witt here, responding to former Dean Anthony Kronman's new book (see this interview for the flavor, although he doesn't discuss the renaming of Calhoun College).  I'm inclined to agree with Professor Witt that renaming Calhoun College was a more than reasonable decision; but I'm also inclined to agree with Professor Kronman that (as he recently wrote in the Wall Street Journal), “Diversity, as it is understood today…means diversity of race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation. Diversity in this sense is not an academic value. Its origin and aspiration are political [i.e. justice for victims of discrimination]. The demand for ever-greater diversity in higher education is a political campaign masquerading as an educational ideal.”  

September 3, 2019 in Faculty News, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

Friday, August 30, 2019

In Memoriam: Norman Lefstein (1937-2019)

Professor Lefstein taught for many years at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill before serving nearly fifteen years as Dean at the McKinney School of Law at Indiana University, Indianapolis, where he was emreitus.  The McKinney memorial notice is here.

August 30, 2019 in Memorial Notices | Permalink

Thursday, August 29, 2019

Law professor twitter census for 2019-20

Here.

August 29, 2019 in Of Academic Interest | Permalink

Monday, August 26, 2019

Chicago Alumni and Fellows on the law teaching market, 2019-20

MOVING TO FRONT--ORIGINALLY POSTED AUGUST 7

This post is strictly for schools that expect to do hiring this year.

In order to protect the privacy of our candidates, please e-mail me at bleiter@uchicago.edu to get a copy of the narrative profiles of our candidates, including hyperlinks to their homepages.  All these candidates will be in the first FAR distribution.

We have an excellent group of nine candidates this year (four alumni, three Bigelows, one Olin Fellow in Law & Economics, and one Dickerson Fellow), who cover many curricular areas including legal profession/professional responsibility, election law, civil procedure, constitutional law, administrative law, legislation, evidence, employment discrimination, race and the law, contracts, consumer law and finance, property, law & economics, empirical legal studies, corporate law and finance, securities regulation, international trade law, international business transactions, bankruptcy, commercial law, alternative dispute resolution, Chinese law, torts, energy law, anti-discrimination law, law & psychology, experimental jurisprudence, and bioethics.

Our candidates include former Supreme Court and federal appellate clerks; Law Review editors; JD/PhDs in Psychology, Finance, Economics, Sociology and Political Science, as well as SJDs; and accomplished practitioners as well as scholars.  All have publications, sometimes multiple publications, and all have writing samples available upon request.

If when you e-mail, you tell me a bit about your hiring needs, I can supply some more information about all these candidates, since we have vetted them all at some point in the recent past.

August 26, 2019 in Faculty News | Permalink

Tuesday, August 20, 2019

New Rambler Review...

....is back.

August 20, 2019 in Of Academic Interest | Permalink

Monday, August 19, 2019

Law schools by number of graduates (JD, LLM and SJD) in the first FAR, 2019

There were 335 total applicants in the first FAR; here are the candidates by law school attended (for JD, LLM, and/or SJD):

Harvard University (36)

Yale University (35)

Georgetown University (22)

New York University (20)

Stanford University (17)

Columbia University (13)

University of Michigan (13)

University of California, Berkeley (11)

University of Pennsylvania (11)

University of Chicago (7)

Duke University (5)

Cornell University (4)

University of Virginia (4)

Northwestern University (3)

University of California, Los Angeles (3)

University of Minnesota (3)

University of Texas, Austin (3)

Vanderbilt University (3)

These eighteen schools account for two-thirds of the applicants for law teaching positions.

August 19, 2019 in Faculty News | Permalink