January 20, 2016

"Most Influential People in Legal Education"

It is alleged I am one, so too Prof. Simkovic (who surely should be, having been single-handedly responsible for bringing facts and serious data analysis to thinking about the financial aspects of legal education).   Whatever the merits of this list, I am pleased to see many esteemed friends and colleagues on it!  And thanks to those readers who took the time to vote in the survey.


January 20, 2016 in Faculty News, Of Academic Interest, Rankings | Permalink

January 18, 2016

Ian Ayres (Yale) argues that the U.S. News rankings have actually helped low-ranked schools during the decline in applicants over the last few years

He sets out his theory here.  Briefly:  highly ranked schools have enrolled fewer students during the decline, rather than taking the more students with weaker credentials, in order to maintain their rank in U.S. News; the result was more students with good (but not top-flight) credentials available for lower-ranked schools.  To which I say:  maybe.  The decline in enrollments at top schools has been small, and many have seen declines in their student credentials anyway.  But it's an intriguing possibility!


January 18, 2016 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Rankings | Permalink

January 05, 2016

Ranking corporate law professors, in the U.S. and internationally

December 21, 2015

California July 2015 Bar Exam results by school

Blog Emperor Caron charts the results.  A strong showing by USC grads, not so much by Berkeley grads, relative to the reputation of the school.  UC Irvine grads did better than UC Davis and UC Hastings grads.  Loyola-LA grads had a typically strong showing, trailing Irvine only slightly.  Some ABA-accredited law schools in California, by contrast, had awful results (e.g., Golden Gate, Whittier).


December 21, 2015 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Rankings | Permalink

December 10, 2015

Most cited property scholars in recent years

Here.  Prof. Clowney tells me, however, that he didn't check for false positives, which might have mattered in some cases.  Also, some of the most cited faculty are now emeritus (e.g., Peggy Radin, Bob Ellickson).


December 10, 2015 in Faculty News, Rankings | Permalink

December 08, 2015

Numerical credentials of law school applicants this fall up "significantly" from last year

Derek Muller (Pepperdine) comments.


December 8, 2015 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Rankings, Student Advice | Permalink

October 30, 2015

LSAT takers up 7.4% in Sept/Oct compared to last year...

...the first increase in six years (link now fixed).  (Recall that June also saw an increase.)  While enrollments will not return to 2010 highs (a good thing!), it's clear that we are arriving at a "new normal" for enrollments.  This is already being felt in the hiring market for new law teachers, which is much more active this year than last.


October 30, 2015 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Rankings | Permalink

October 28, 2015

N.Y. Times is Mistaken: Law Student Loans are Safe and Profitable for the Government (Michael Simkovic)

This weekend, The New York Times Editorial Board  published a sensationalist lead editorial, “The Law School Debt Crisis,”  claiming that law student borrowing is harmful to taxpayers.  The New York Times is mistaken.

The Times cited Florida Coastal School of Law, a for-profit institution, as its prime example of law schools “vacuuming up hordes of young people, charging them outrageously high tuition and, after many of the students fail to become lawyers, sticking taxpayers with the tab for their loan defaults.”  Florida Coastal seems like an easy target—even a Federal Court which dismissed a fraud suit against Florida Coastal described it as having “some of the lowest admissions standards of accredited or provisionally accredited law schools in the nation.” The Times has repeatedly criticized for-profit colleges, which it deems “predatory” based on their unusually high student loan default rates. (See opinion, upshot, news and news again). 

If the Editorial Board's accusations were true—if the “majority of law schools” really were running “a scam” in which they load down their students with “crushing amounts of debt” which “they can’t repay”—Florida Coastal and other law schools should have among the highest default rates of any institutions of higher education in the country.

They don’t and they aren’t.

Slide2

For the cohort entering repayment in 2012—the most recent year of data available*—the national 3-year cohort default rate on federal student loans was 11.8 percent.  The comparable figure for Florida Coastal was only 1.1 percent—more than 10 times lower.

This isn’t a one-time fluke.  In 2010 and 2011, Flordida Coastal's 3-year Default rates  were 1.6 and 5.2 percent, respectively, compared to much higher national rates of 13.7 and 14.7 percent.

Other measures tracked by the Department of Education, like repayment rates, also show law school borrowers performing as well or better than most.

We see the same pattern across law schools and going back decades for which data is available.**  Even low ranked law schools with allegedly “outrageously high” tuition generally have much lower student loan default rates than either the national average, or the average for institutions that grant bachelor’s or advanced degrees. 

Slide1

Law students not only have higher debts than most student loan borrowers; as professional students, they also pay higher interest rates on government loans than undergraduates.  

Law students rarely default because the financial benefits they receive from attending law school are usually far greater than the costs.*** Law school typically boosts annual earnings by around $30,000 (median) to $60,000 per year (mean) compared to a bachelor’s degree.****  Even at the 25th percentile, toward the low end of the distribution, the annual boost to earnings is around $20,000 per year—more than enough to repay typical law school loans over the course of a career.

Taxpayers also benefit.  For every extra dollar a law graduate earns, the federal government receives an extra 30 to 40 cents in payroll and income taxes.  The federal government charges far more in taxes than most law schools charge in tuition.

But the government isn’t paying for most law graduates’ education.  In fact, loans to law students are among the most profitable in the federal government’s student loan portfolio, thanks to high interest rates and low default rates.  Many law graduates are such good credit risks, and are overcharged so much by the government, that private lenders have offered to refinance law graduate loans for substantially lower interest rates. 

There are cases in which particular individuals have unusually bad outcomes and struggle to repay their loans.  Thankfully, these situations are relatively rare among law graduates. 

Incomes for law graduates may seem low when they first graduate, but typically climb rapidly over the next several decades.  Education loans exist precisely so that borrowed money can be repaid later in life, when employment is more stable and incomes are usually higher. 

Slide1

 

The New York Times is right that many law school graduates—around 40 percent—do not practice law. But law graduates do not have to practice law or earn spectacular salaries to benefit financially from their degrees and repay their loans over their careers.  They need only earn roughly $10,000 per year more than they would have earned without a law degree. The overwhelming majority of law graduates, including those not practicing law, receive substantially larger boosts to their earnings.

Thanks to income based repayment programs with debt forgiveness and progressive taxation, the overwhelming majority of successful law school graduates can offset the risks of investment in education for those rare unfortunate individuals who do not benefit as much from their educations.

It would be a mistake to let the small tail of defaults wag the much larger dog of public benefits.

Scaling back access to federal student loans to law students will not benefit taxpayers.  To the contrary, the loss of revenue would mean larger deficits for the government, and eventually higher taxes for the rest of us. 

Continue reading


October 28, 2015 in Guest Blogger: Michael Simkovic, Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice, Rankings, Science, Weblogs | Permalink

October 23, 2015

$100 million naming gift for the law school at Northwestern University

Wow!  The Pritzkers are Chicago billionaires, heir to the Hyatt Hotel chain fortune.  There is also a Pritzker School of Medicine at the University of Chicago.

(Sorry for not posting this sooner, I was on the road.)


October 23, 2015 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Rankings | Permalink

October 08, 2015

SSRN Downloads over the last year, October 1 edition

The top ten:

1.  Cass Sunstein (Harvard) (34,636 downloads, 34 new papers)

2.  Mark Lemley (Stanford) (17,511 downloads, 10 new papers)

3.  Daniel Solove (George Washington) (17,219 downloads, 1 new paper)

4.  Dan Kahan (Yale) (17,114 downloads, 4 new papers)

5.  Orin Kerr (George Washington) (14,368 downloads, 6 new papers)

6.  Lucian Bebchuk (Harvard) (13,657 downloads, 1 new paper)

7.  Brian Leiter (Chicago) (11,955 downloads, 10 new papers)

8.  Bernard Black (Northwestern) (10,674 downloads, 2 new papers)

9.  Kent Roach (Toronto) (9,109 downloads, 11 new papers)

10. Eric Posner (Chicago) (8,671 downloads, 8 new papers)


October 8, 2015 in Faculty News, Rankings | Permalink