December 04, 2017

Stanford Business school claimed to be awarding only "need-based financial aid"...

...but they weren't.  Several law schools, including Stanford, make the same claim, and I suspect an analysis of the real data would show something similar.  Ever since we were fortunate to be able to award Rubinstein Scholarships to incoming students, I've been amused to discover how often Yale and Harvard find those students to be especially "needy." 


December 4, 2017 in Of Academic Interest, Rankings | Permalink

November 13, 2017

The Top 40 U.S. law faculties in terms of scholarly excellence, 2017 edition

The poll covering the rest of the top 40 got more than 300 votes (compared to a bit more than 160 for "the top 20"), no doubt because more schools were involved.   The obvious drawback of a poll like this--namely, that people can vote for their own school and try to vote strategically--is counteracted by the Condorcet method (which defeats most strategic voting) and by sufficient participation; in the end, the folks who rank their own school #1 have little effect on their own school, what matters is their relative ordering of everyone else.

I've combined the results of the two polls to produce a "top 40" law faculties in terms of scholarly distinction.  Especially outside the top 20, presenting lists of faculty names seems to have muted the U.S. News effect present from earlier polls even more, as reflected in, e.g., the disappearance of Wisconsin and Arizona State from the top 40 (they are all top 40 in U.S. News), and the significant improvements for San Diego, Brooklyn, and Cardozo.  (I actually think ASU should be in the top 40 for faculty quality, but the poll had it a bit outside.)

In any case, this seems to be a far more plausible "top 40" in terms of scholarly quality of the faculty than we've gotten from prior surveys, let alone from U.S. News.  (Personally, I think Illinois and Hastings are underranked here, but that's another story.)

1. Yale University  (Condorcet winner: wins contests with all other choices)
2. Harvard University  loses to Yale University by 77–67
3. University of Chicago  loses to Yale University by 118–32, loses to Harvard University by 127–21
4. New York University  loses to Yale University by 122–28, loses to University of Chicago by 79–60
5. Stanford University  loses to Yale University by 121–29, loses to New York University by 73–65
6. Columbia University  loses to Yale University by 126–21, loses to Stanford University by 85–56
7. University of California, Berkeley loses to Yale University by 137–15, loses to Columbia University by 113–29
8. University of Pennsylvania loses to Yale University by 140–9, loses to University of California, Berkeley by 74–62
9. University of Virginia loses to Yale University by 138–9, loses to University of Pennsylvania by 75–55
10. University of Michigan loses to Yale University by 140–9, loses to University of Virginia by 69–52
11. Duke University loses to Yale University by 144–6, loses to University of Michigan by 78–49
12. Northwestern University loses to Yale University by 142–8, loses to Duke University by 67–62
13. Georgetown University loses to Yale University by 140–10, loses to Northwestern University by 70–63
14. Cornell University loses to Yale University by 144–5, loses to Georgetown University by 71–63
15. University of California, Los Angeles loses to Yale University by 141–9, loses to Cornell University by 66–61
16. University of Texas, Austin  loses to Yale University by 144–4, loses to University of California, Los Angeles by 74–49
17. Vanderbilt University loses to Yale University by 139–6, loses to University of Texas by 77–41
18. University of Southern California loses to Yale University by 141–6, loses to Vanderbilt University by 67–54
19. George Washington University  loses to Yale University by 138–11, loses to University of Southern California by 81–43
20. University of California, Irvine loses to Yale University by 143–6, loses to George Washington University by 70–57
21. University of Minnesota loses to Yale University by 141–7, loses to University of California, Irvine by 62–56
22. Boston University
23. Emory University  loses to Boston University by 142–119
24. Washington University, St. Louis loses to Boston University by 141–125, loses to Emory University by 141–124
25. Fordham University loses to Boston University by 158–91, loses to Washington University, St. Louis by 149–108
26. University of Notre Dame Boston University by 159–97, loses to Fordham University by 137–116
27. University of California, Davis loses to Boston University by 170–83, loses to University of Notre Dame by 127–117
28. Boston College loses to Boston University by 174–66, loses to University of California, Davis by 131–118
29. College of Wiliam & Mary loses to Boston University by 180–69, loses to Boston College by 129–115
30. Brooklyn Law School  loses to Boston University by 172–74, loses to College of Wiliam & Mary by 129–114
30. University of San Diego  loses to Boston University by 175–78, loses to Brooklyn Law School by 123–121
32. Cardozo Law School loses to Boston University by 189–55, loses to University of San Diego by 128–118
33. University of Illinois loses to Boston University by 184–60, loses to Brooklyn Law School by 128–107
34. Ohio State University  loses to Boston University by 184–58, loses to University of Illinois by 121–112
35. University of North Carolina loses to Boston University by 183–68, loses to Ohio State University by 121–115
36. Indiana University, Bloomington loses to Boston University by 203–44, loses to University of North Carolina by 123–111
37. University of California, Hastings loses to Boston University by 185–67, loses to Indiana University, Bloomington by 121–110
37. University of Iowa loses to Boston University) by 192–56, loses to University of California, Hastings by 117–115
39. Florida State University loses to Boston University by 197–47, loses to University of Iowa by 118–112
40. George Mason University loses to Boston University by 188–53, loses to Florida State University by 124–97
Runner-up:  University of Alabama loses to George Mason University by 115–103


November 13, 2017 in Rankings | Permalink

November 11, 2017

From Texas Wesleyan to Texas A&M...

November 08, 2017

Now the rest of the top 40 law faculties in terms of scholarly excellence

This is the follow-up to the poll last week, seeking to evaluate 30 additional law faculties that might have some claim to being in the "top 40" for scholarly distinction.  Recall that UC Irvine and Minnesota rounded out the top 21, so this poll will rank 22 through 40.  Have fun!   Remember that the listing of faculty is merely representative (basically, the roughly 15 most-cited faculty at each school), but you may of course take into account other faculty at the school in assessing its scholarly strength.  Also, note that the poll will ask you to rank 1-30, but only "the top 19" will "win," i.e., fill out the top 40 when conjoined with the earlier poll.

UPDATE:  There's a typo in the Hastings faculty list:  the last person should be Joan C. Williams (not "John").  And for Notre Dame, it's "Richard Garnett" (not "Barnett").   In addition, Thomas Mitchell is wrongly listed with Wisconsin; he is now the Interim Dean at Texas A&M (Ann Althouse is also retired at Wisconsin).

PLEASE NOTE:  Any school that uses social media to rally voters will be disqualified from the results!  It is fine, however, to e-mail colleagues to invite them to participate in the survey; this will help wash out some of the attempts at strategic voting that affects the early results.  But no twitter or Facebook or blog postings about this!  (Please e-mail me if you spot violations of our strict survey protocol!)

ANOTHER ERROR OF OMISSION:  Stewart Sterk was supposed to have been on the Cardozo Law School faculty list.  Someone just pointed out that he was left off in error.


November 8, 2017 in Rankings | Permalink

November 03, 2017

Top 20 U.S. law faculties in terms of scholarly excellence, 2017 edition

So with a bit more than 160 votes over the last 48 hours, here are the results for the poll that presented evaluators with faculty names, rather than simply school names:

1. Yale University  (Condorcet winner: wins contests with all other choices)
2. Harvard University  loses to Yale University by 77–67
3. University of Chicago  loses to Yale University by 118–32, loses to Harvard University by 127–21
4. New York University  loses to Yale University by 122–28, loses to University of Chicago by 79–60
5. Stanford University  loses to Yale University by 121–29, loses to New York University by 73–65
6. Columbia University  loses to Yale University by 126–21, loses to Stanford University by 85–56
7. University of California, Berkeley loses to Yale University by 137–15, loses to Columbia University by 113–29
8. University of Pennsylvania loses to Yale University by 140–9, loses to University of California, Berkeley by 74–62
9. University of Virginia loses to Yale University by 138–9, loses to University of Pennsylvania by 75–55
10. University of Michigan loses to Yale University by 140–9, loses to University of Virginia by 69–52
11. Duke University loses to Yale University by 144–6, loses to University of Michigan by 78–49
12. Northwestern University loses to Yale University by 142–8, loses to Duke University by 67–62
13. Georgetown University loses to Yale University by 140–10, loses to Northwestern University by 70–63
14. Cornell University loses to Yale University by 144–5, loses to Georgetown University by 71–63
15. University of California, Los Angeles loses to Yale University by 141–9, loses to Cornell University by 66–61
16. University of Texas, Austin  loses to Yale University by 144–4, loses to University of California, Los Angeles by 74–49
17. Vanderbilt University loses to Yale University by 139–6, loses to University of Texas by 77–41
18. University of Southern California loses to Yale University by 141–6, loses to Vanderbilt University by 67–54
19. George Washington University  loses to Yale University by 138–11, loses to University of Southern California by 81–43
20. University of California, Irvine loses to Yale University by 143–6, loses to George Washington University by 70–57
Runner-up (essentially tied with UC Irvine):  University of Minnesota loses to Yale University by 141–7, loses to University of California, Irvine by 62–56

 

Now compared to earlier Condorcet Internet polls I've run here, which just presented school names, this survey did seem to have some minor impact on muting the U.S. News effect:  e.g., Stanford dropped from third to fifth, while NYU easily bested Columbia.  I may try to put together another such poll for schools in the 21-30 range, say--perhaps next week. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


November 3, 2017 in Faculty News, Rankings | Permalink

November 01, 2017

Top 20 law faculties in terms of scholarly excellence

Each fall, I've run a condorcet poll about "top law faculties," but just listing school names.  This year, I am going to try something slightly different, and if it works, I'll expand it beyond the top 20.   At this link, you will get a list of roughly 15 faculty members at 24 law schools that might be in the "top 20."   The listing of faculty is representative; we primarily used the most recent Sisk citation data, but sometimes added faculty who were elected to the American Academy even if not in the top 15 for citations.   The name of the school appears parentheses, but let's see if asking readers to look at the names of faculty first affects their ranking.

Have fun!

ADDENDUM:  The list for Georgetown should have included David Luban, that was an accidental omission.


November 1, 2017 in Faculty News, Rankings | Permalink

October 19, 2017

Best publishers of scholarly monographs in law?

More than 160 readers voted in our poll from earlier in the week, and here are the results:

1. Oxford University Press  (Condorcet winner: wins contests with all other choices)
2. Cambridge University Press  loses to Oxford University Press by 95–56
3. Harvard University Press  loses to Oxford University Press by 95–56, loses to Cambridge University Press by 93–60
4. Yale University Press  loses to Oxford University Press by 117–33, loses to Harvard University Press by 113–34
5. Princeton University Press  loses to Oxford University Press by 122–25, loses to Yale University Press by 70–67
 

University of Chicago Press was runner-up, trailing Princeton 81-51 (Princeton was essentially tied with Yale).   These seem to me like fairly sensible results--interesting how the two UK publishers dominate.  The mystery of the Harvard catalogue is how uneven it is, perhaps because it is bigger than, say, Princeton's or Yale's law catalogues.


October 19, 2017 in Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice, Rankings | Permalink

October 16, 2017

Best academic publishers in law?

We haven't done this poll in about eight years, so here it is once again.   Choose "none of the above" if you think options not represented are better than the remaining options offered.  Remember, this poll concerns solely the quality of scholarship monographs published by different presses (so this is not about publishers of treatises or casebooks, for example). Have fun!


October 16, 2017 in Of Academic Interest, Rankings | Permalink

June 12, 2017

Applicants down half of one percent in 2016-17 cycle...

...while the drop in high-end LSAT scores is steeper.

I'll be on a reduced blogging schedule for the summer (look for one or two items per week), but will update the lateral moves list periodically as well as start the new one in August.  (Mike Simkovic, who has posting privileges here as well, may be posting as well in the summer.)

Thanks for reading, and I wish everyone a productive and pleasant summer.


June 12, 2017 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Rankings | Permalink

June 01, 2017

Rookie hiring collapsed again this year (only 60+ rookie hires nationwide)...

...according to the data helpfully compiled by Professor Sarah Lawsky (Northwestern).  On the other hand, my strong impression is that there's been an increase in untenured lateral movements--several schools that advertised for rookies, and indeed interviewed at the "meat market," ended up hiring untenured laterals--not surprising, given that the tight market the last few years means many candidates probably underplaced to how they would have done in normal times.

You can see figures on the total number of graduates each school had on the market this year here.  The top ten were:

Harvard University (35)

Georgetown University (31)

Yale University (26)

New York University (25)

University of Michigan (18)

Columbia University (16)

Northwestern University (14)

Stanford University (12)

University of California, Berkeley (12)

University of Pennsylvania (9)

George Washington University (8)

(Chicago had a light year, just three graduates on the market, only two of whom we were working with, one of whom got multiple offers and did accept a job.  Some other recent Chicago JDs were among the untenured laterals this year as well.)


June 1, 2017 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Faculty News, Rankings | Permalink