December 01, 2016

Law schools ranked by employment outcomes based on 2015 ABA data

Here, which also notes (and links to) other ways of crunching the data.


December 1, 2016 in Legal Profession, Rankings, Student Advice | Permalink

November 22, 2016

July 2016 California bar exam "carnage"

That's the Blog Emperor's characterization of the latest results, though California still has many graduates of non-ABA-accredited law schools taking the California bar and passing at very low rates (1 out of 4 or less).


November 22, 2016 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Rankings | Permalink

November 15, 2016

New York switches to "Uniform Bar Exam" and overall pass rate rises 4%

Details here.  NYU, Columbia, and Cornell had the three best pass rates, but it's striking that Syracuse came in 4th, ahead of Fordham, Brooklyn, and Cardozo among others.  So whatever Syracuse is doing, other schools should take a look!


November 15, 2016 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Rankings | Permalink

October 31, 2016

Enrollment trends, 2010 to 2016

Blog Emperor Caron has been tracking them at various schools.   At almost all the schools covered, enrollment is down substantially since 2010 and, even so, the numerical credentials of the enrolled students are also down.


October 31, 2016 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Rankings | Permalink

October 27, 2016

2 of 10 law schools randomly audited by ABA...

...were found to be well below the required compliance level with ABA rules regarding the reporting of employment data.  Two others were slightly below the required compliance level of 95%.


October 27, 2016 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Rankings | Permalink

October 12, 2016

New Minnesota Law Dean talks about adjusting to significant application and enrollment declines

October 10, 2016

A Nobel Prize in Law?

 It's Nobel Prize season, and Law, like my other field, Philosophy, is not a recognized subject for the prize.  But what if there were a Nobel Prize?  I surveyed my philosophy readers, and came up with ten deserving candidates.  But what about for law?  I've limited this just to those working in the U.S., though there are many deserving candidates in other legal cultures, but I suspect few readers will know enough about them to meaningfully compare (outside jurisprudence, I hardly know enough to even correctly identify plausible candidates).

So which living legal scholar in the U.S. should get a Nobel Prize in Law? We'll rank the top ten.  Have fun!

ADDENDUM:  I hope it goes without saying that there are no doubt errors of omission in the list.  One that has come to my attention, who might have had a shot for the top ten, is Richard Delgado, now at Alabama.  But I fear there will be others.

A LAST ONE:  Some other good suggestions for folks who should have been included:  Elizabeth Warren, Wayne LaFave, Suzanna Sherry, Charles Lawrence.


October 10, 2016 in Faculty News, Rankings | Permalink

October 03, 2016

50 Best Law Faculties, 2016 edition

Well, respondents to the poll were supposed to be evaluating the scholarly distinction of the faculties, but it's not clear they were, given how close many (but not all) results track the U.S. News nonsense number, which is many things, but not a measure of the scholarly distinction of the faculty.   How else to explain, say, the fact that NYU ranks behind Columbia, a result which fits the U.S. News result but not plausible metrics of faculty quality?   Still there were several schools that over-performed their U.S. News rank, in each case rightly so I think:

UC Irvine came in #21 here, but #28 in U.S. News

Fordham came in #27 here, but #37 in U.S. News

University of Illinois came in #29 here, but #40 in U.S. News

UC Hastings came in #37 here, but #50 in U.S. News

Florida State came in #39 here, but #50 in U.S. News

San Diego came in #44 here, but #74 in U.S. News

Brooklyn came in #46 here, but #97 in U.S. News

Cardozo came in #48 here, but #74 in U.S. News

Schools that underperformed here in comparison to U.S. News by a significant margin include:

Arizona State University:  #25 in U.S. News, #40 here.

Indiana University, Bloomington:  #25 in U.S. news, #35 here.

University of Georgia:  #33 in U.S. News, #43 here

Brigham Young University:  #38 in U.S. News, not in the top fifty here

In some of these cases, there are good reasons why the schools fare better in U.S. News (e.g., caliber of student body, job placement).

In any case, with 422 votes cast here are the results for 2016 (and for comparison, here's 2014--an ambitious person might see whether changes from 2014 to 2016 are explained by change in U.S. news rank of the school!):

1. Yale University  (Condorcet winner: wins contests with all other choices)
2. Harvard University  loses to Yale University by 197–158
3. Stanford University  loses to Yale University by 294–68, loses to Harvard University by 287–72
4. University of Chicago  loses to Yale University by 304–58, loses to Stanford University by 211–144
5. Columbia University  loses to Yale University by 326–43, loses to University of Chicago by 193–154
6. New York University  loses to Yale University by 334–31, loses to Columbia University by 195–154
7. University of California, Berkeley  loses to Yale University by 351–23, loses to New York University by 262–93
8. University of Pennsylvania  loses to Yale University by 351–16, loses to University of California, Berkeley by 205–137
9. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor  loses to Yale University by 355–15, loses to University of Pennsylvania by 181–151
10. University of Virginia  loses to Yale University by 356–10, loses to University of Michigan, Ann Arbor by 189–135
11. Duke University  loses to Yale University by 354–9, loses to University of Virginia by 202–130
12. Georgetown University  loses to Yale University by 356–10, loses to Duke University by 205–128
13. Northwestern University  loses to Yale University by 351–12, loses to Georgetown University by 177–148
14. Cornell University  loses to Yale University by 355–10, loses to Northwestern University by 167–156
15. University of California, Los Angeles  loses to Yale University by 358–12, loses to Cornell University by 176–152
16. University of Texas, Austin  loses to Yale University by 356–7, loses to University of California, Los Angeles by 194–129
17. Vanderbilt University  loses to Yale University by 354–7, loses to University of Texas, Austin by 203–100
18. University of Southern California  loses to Yale University by 346–8, loses to Vanderbilt University by 201–95
19. Tied:
Boston University  loses to Yale University by 353–5, loses to University of Southern California by 192–99
University of Minnesota  loses to Yale University by 347–6, loses to University of Southern California by 181–103
21. University of California, Irvine  loses to Yale University by 355–8, loses to Boston University by 169–124
22. Tied:
George Washington University  loses to Yale University by 350–5, loses to University of California, Irvine by 148–147
Washington University, St. Louis  loses to Yale University by 348–2, loses to University of California, Irvine by 151–144
24. Emory University  loses to Yale University by 347–6, loses to George Washington University by 151–118
25. University of Notre Dame  loses to Yale University by 347–4, loses to Emory University by 164–98
26. University of California, Davis  loses to Yale University by 345–11, loses to University of Notre Dame by 144–129
27. Fordham University  loses to Yale University by 348–6, loses to University of California, Davis by 149–136
28. Boston College  loses to Yale University by 346–8, loses to Fordham University by 137–135
29. University of Illinois  loses to Yale University by 341–4, loses to Boston College by 154–111
30. University of Iowa  loses to Yale University by 342–3, loses to University of Illinois by 129–113
31. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill  loses to Yale University by 344–4, loses to University of Iowa by 130–120
32. University of Wisconsin, Madison  loses to Yale University by 341–2, loses to University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill by 154–102
33. College of William & Mary  loses to Yale University by 341–6, loses to University of Wisconsin, Madison by 130–123
34. University of Alabama  loses to Yale University by 336–8, loses to College of William & Mary by 143–115
35. Indiana University, Bloomington  loses to Yale University by 337–3, loses to University of Alabama by 126–117
36. Ohio State University  loses to Yale University by 343–3, loses to Indiana University, Bloomington by 130–108
37. University of California, Hastings College of Law  loses to Yale University by 342–5, loses to Ohio State University by 129–114
38. University of Arizona  loses to Yale University by 339–7, loses to University of California, Hastings College of Law by 130–111
39. Florida State University  loses to Yale University by 335–6, loses to University of Arizona by 137–104
40. Arizona State University  loses to Yale University by 331–9, loses to Florida State University by 125–116
41. University of Colorado  loses to Yale University by 335–5, loses to Arizona State University by 124–107
42. George Mason University  loses to Yale University by 340–7, loses to Arizona State University by 137–111
43. University of Georgia  loses to Yale University by 334–4, loses to University of Colorado by 124–102
44. University of San Diego  loses to Yale University by 342–9, loses to University of Georgia by 125–110
45. University of Washington, Seattle  loses to Yale University by 335–3, loses to University of San Diego by 122–113
46. Brooklyn Law School  loses to Yale University by 337–11, loses to University of Washington, Seattle by 131–117
47. University of Florida  loses to Yale University by 330–3, loses to Brooklyn Law School by 125–110
48. Yeshiva University/Cardozo School of Law  loses to Yale University by 331–4, loses to University of Florida by 121–110
49. Washington & Lee University  loses to Yale University by 333–4, loses to Yeshiva University/Cardozo School of Law by 122–100
50. University of Maryland  loses to Yale University by 329–4, loses to Washington & Lee University by 115–101


October 3, 2016 in Rankings | Permalink

September 28, 2016

50 Best Law School Faculties in Terms of Scholarly Distinction, 2016 edition

Here's a list of 76 faculties that might have some claim on having one of the 50 strongest law faculties in terms of scholarly distinction (with apologies to any wrongly omitted).  Have fun!  Detailed ballott reporting will make attempts at strategic voting obvious, so don't!  I'll call out your school!  Remember, this is about the scholarly distinction of the faculties, so if all you know is the U.S. News rank, don't complete the survey, or choose "no opinion" for those schools! 

BAD BEHAVIOR WATCH:  Remarkably, 4  people have ranked Arizona State ahead of Yale!  I wonder where they teach?  By way of comparison, only 3 people ranked Columbia ahead of Yale (though 5 did give that edge to Berkeley)--at least this voting is defensible, depending on one's benchmarks for scholarly excellence.  ASU is one of the top regional law schools in my judgment, but there's no honest ordering in which it comes out ahead of Yale.  (I use Yale as the comparison only because that's easy to read off the data, since Yale is currently #1--when Harvard was #1, the pattern was similar.)  If you want to get a sense of attempted strategic voting, take a look at how much schools lower down the list lose to Yale by:  most lose in a shut-out, but several, including ASU, do not.  Tsk, tsk!


September 28, 2016 in Rankings | Permalink

September 26, 2016

Law school enrollment trends 2010-2015 in one state: Indiana

The Midwest was hit slightly harder by the downturn in applications than other parts of the country, but still this chart shows where we are from the 2010 peak, and also that many schools are recovering a bit.  (2010, it is important to remember, was the peak for applications and enrollments.)


September 26, 2016 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Rankings | Permalink