April 11, 2013

Which areas of law deserve more attention/investment from law schools...

...in the form of more full-time faculty doing research in the area.  It's our topic du jour, so perhaps a poll of readers will prove informative.  No lobbying for votes by blogs in particular areas!  The poll only includes areas about which one hears with some regluarity concern that they are under-treated by law schools (so no constitutional law, corporate law, tax, criminal law, which almost all law schools are well-represented in or try to be).

When the results are in, I'll open them for discussion next week.

UPDATE:  Unfortunately, the Workplace Law blog linked to the poll, which resulted in a surge for employment law.  I've asked  them to remove the link, otherwise we will have to drop employment law from the results, which would be unfortunate.

Posted by Brian Leiter on April 11, 2013 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice | Permalink

Is hiring of labor and employment law professors disproportionately down?

I'm skeptical.

Posted by Brian Leiter on April 11, 2013 in Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice, Student Advice | Permalink

April 01, 2013

Disclosing material/economic interests in scholarship

More law reviews should adopt this policy.

Posted by Brian Leiter on April 1, 2013 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice | Permalink

February 28, 2013

Georgetown's Report on the State of the Legal Market for 2013

Not good news (not surprising), and definitely worth reading.  It comes pretty squarely down in favor of Bill Henderson's longstanding hypothesis that the changes afoot are structural not cyclical.

Posted by Brian Leiter on February 28, 2013 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice, Student Advice | Permalink

February 20, 2013

Paul Campos admits he doesn't "even [know] what it means" to think like a lawyer

This probably explains a lot.  Fortunately, Fred Schauer has recently written a book that could help him with his questions, like, "What does it mean to teach people to think like lawyers?  How is thinking like a lawyer different from ordinary thinking?" 

(Thanks to Nick Smith for the pointer.)

UPDATE:  A senior legal academic, who has been involved extensively with legal education reform, writes:  "Keep up the Campos bashing.  I think that some of the law school critics have done a good service.  Even when I don't agree with everything, it was necessary for legal educators to give up a bit of complacency.  I've never met Campos, but he is disgraceful."  It's hard to disagree with any of that, but I don't really plan to keep up the "bashing," since, as we saw a few weeks back, by Campos's own admission, there really isn't much content to his routine. 

 

Posted by Brian Leiter on February 20, 2013 in Jurisprudence, Law Professors Saying Dumb Things, Legal Humor, Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice | Permalink

February 19, 2013

Racial, ethnic and other "identity" diversity in article selection?

A reader alerted me a couple of weeks ago to the fact that Scholastica collects demographic data on authors, which apparently some journals are using in the selection process.  Before I got around to it, the issue has exploded on various blogs; Blog Emperor Caron has links to the various discussions.  Given that the law reviews had been moving to more peer (i.e., faculty) review of scholarship, this does seem a step backwards, but much will turn on what law reviews are really doing with this information.

Posted by Brian Leiter on February 19, 2013 in Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice | Permalink

February 04, 2013

Submitting to law reviews

Updated for Spring 2013.  Co-author Nancy Levit (Missouri/Kansas City) writes:   

The highlights from this round of revisions include the following:  First, there has been movement toward Scholastica and we have tried to track which law reviews prefer Scholastica or exclusively accept through that channel.  Second, the chart now includes, where available, information about whenjournals are open to receive articles—i.e. the opening date for the submission season.


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Posted by Brian Leiter on February 4, 2013 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice | Permalink

February 01, 2013

"Downsizing" legal education

Dean Yellen (Loyola-Chicago) makes several very good points.

Posted by Brian Leiter on February 1, 2013 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice, Rankings | Permalink

January 23, 2013

ABA Task Force on the Future of Legal Education...

...is soliciting comments.  You can read the comments received so far here.  I haven't read them all, but of those I did read, the comments from Frank Wu, Dean at Hastings, sounds the right themes, while the one from Scott Fruehwald, formerly a legal writing instructor at Hofstra, is notable for its infatuation with gimmicky educational theories, and will presumably be ignored.   I trust readers of this blog will submit comments; I plan to do so shortly.

 

Posted by Brian Leiter on January 23, 2013 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice | Permalink

November 08, 2012

Blogging a faculty meeting?

Paul Campos, of self-promotion fame, has now written what purports to be a description of both the content and then the vote of a faculty meeting at his school, the University of Colorado at Boulder, concerning the expansion of its LLM program.  Campos was the lone dissenter, so he claims, arguing that it was not clear there were jobs for those who would get this LLM.  He claims that none of his colleagues responded to his objections, and that everyone, but him, then voted for the expansion of the LLM program anyway.  (His omission of any detailed discussion of the reasons for the proposal no doubt contributes to the unfavorable impression he gives of his colleagues.)

I have to say I've never before seen anyone blog the substance of a faculty meeting or disclose a vote, let alone do so in a way that is meant to insult and humiliate his colleagues.   I wonder whether such actions do not violate university rules, but perhaps not.  I guess time will tell.

UPDATE:  James Grimmelman (New York Law School) asks, "Might it not also be the case that his colleagues were reluctant to discuss the proposal at the faculty meeting out of a concern that whatever they said would be published on Professor Campos's blog?"  That's plausible, but would also suggest that he is now disrupting the ability of the school to operate, which would have serious consequences.  And maybe those consequences are starting to materialize?  Certainly, the latest item on the Campos blog suggests he has jumped the shark:

Recently I've been nominated for a couple of law school dean positions.  I've even toyed with the idea of formally applying.  Although unlike Mitt Romney and Donald Trump I can't claim to enjoy firing people per se, I do think I'd positively relish the opportunity to give the ziggy to the significant percentage of employees at the typical law school who deserve to have their sinecures terminated with extreme prejudice.

Wow!

Posted by Brian Leiter on November 8, 2012 in Law in Cyberspace, Law Professors Saying Dumb Things, Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice | Permalink