Tuesday, April 18, 2017

The 10 most cited health law scholars, 2010-2014 (Michael Simkovic)

Mark Hall and Glenn Cohen have extended Brian Leiter's approach to ranking faculty by scholarly citations (based on Sisk data) to the field of health law.

According to Hall and Cohen, the most cited health law scholars in 2010-2014 (inclusive) are:

Rank Name School Citations Approx. Age in 2017
1 Larry Gostin Georgetown 510     67
2 Mark A. Hall Wake Forest 480     62
3 David A. Hyman Georgetown 360     56
4 I. Glenn Cohen Harvard 320     39
5 John A. Robertson Texas 310     74
6 Mark Rothstein Louisville 300     68
6 Michelle M. Mello Stanford 300     46
6 Frank Pasquale Maryland 300     43
9 Lars Noah Florida 280     52
10 George J. Annas Boston U 270     72

 

The full ranking is available here.

April 18, 2017 in Guest Blogger: Michael Simkovic, Law in Cyberspace, Of Academic Interest, Rankings, Weblogs | Permalink

Monday, April 17, 2017

UNC's Gene Nichol blasts politically motivated attack on Civil Rights Center, as well as university leadership

A searing indictment, and an embarrassment for the university and the state.

April 17, 2017 in Faculty News, Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

Friday, April 14, 2017

Former Berkeley Law Dean Choudhry settles lawsuits with Berkeley and with the secretary, Ms. Sorrell, who accused him of sexual harassment

The full settlement agreement with Berkeley is here:   Download Choudhry - Fully Executed SA

Briefly:  Prof. Choudhry will resign at the end of the 2017-18 academic year; he will pay $50,000 towards Ms. Sorrell's legal fees and $50,000 towards a designated charity; the university acknowledges that Prof. Choudhry was not found to have committed any sexual assault or to have acted with any sexual intent.  I am on the road, so if I've missed relevant details in my cursory review of the settlement, please e-mail me.

UPDATE:  I was astonished to see these statements from Ms. Sorell and her lawyer:

A woman who sued the University of California and the former dean of UC Berkeley's law school for sexual harassment is outraged that the school is allowing him to keep his tenured professorship, she announced Saturday...

 

"This is just one more example of UC refusing to take sexual harassment seriously and once again offering a soft landing even after a finding of harassment," Sorrell's attorney, Leslie F. Levy, said Saturday.

One of Prof. Choudhry's attorneys wrote to me: "You will be interested to know that Ms. Sorrell and her lawyers have had our agreement with UC for over a month and had no objection."   But put that to one side:   this reaction to the settlement is insane.  Prof. Choudhry has given up his tenured position, and given up his salary effective July 1; he gets the "title" for another year, but is on an unpaid "sabbatical" [sic].  That is supposed to be evidence that Berkeley offered the accused a "soft landing"?  What exactly does the plaintiff want here? 

Everyone I have heard from speaks very highly of Ms. Sorrell, who was undoubtedfly subjected to wrongful treatment, even if it was done, as Berkeley admits, without sexual intent; so I fear she has here been given very bad advice by her attorney at this point, who is presumably responsible for this absurd and vindictive pronouncement.

ANOTHER:  Ms. Sorrell and her attorney got a payout of $1.7 million from Berkeley as part of their settlement.  That's an astonishing number when you recall that, e.g., Steven Salaita, wrongfully fired from a tenured position by the University of Illinois and his attorneys got only $850,000 a few years ago.  The exraordinarily large settlement also makes the vindictive comments about Choudhry all the more striking.

April 14, 2017 in Faculty News | Permalink

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Five law professors elected Fellows of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences

They are:  Heather Gerken (the new Dean at Yale), George Triantis (Stanford), James Whitman (Yale), Tim Wu (Columbia), and Jonathan Zittrain (Harvard).

April 12, 2017 in Faculty News | Permalink

February Bar Exam, Florida results

The big winners were graduates of Florida International University and the University of Miami.

April 12, 2017 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Rankings | Permalink

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

USNews.com adds GRE scores to ranking formula

Bill Henderson (Indiana) comments.  (I'm more skeptical than Henderson appears to be that the adoption of GRE by Harvard had anything to do with rankings, though.  Harvard's US News problem has to do with its size, and nothing else--if it were even half the size it is, it would be #1 every year.  But being more than twice the size of Yale, Stanford, and Chicago means it is punished in the per capita expenditures measure because of economies of scale.)

Isn't it a bit nutty that law school admissions in the United States are run by a guy who works for a ranking website?

April 11, 2017 in Rankings | Permalink

Friday, April 7, 2017

The latest from LSAC on applicants

"As of 3/31/17, there are 319,072 applications submitted by 47,916 applicants for the 2017–2018 academic year. Applicants are down 1.9% and applications are up 0.3% from 2016–2017.  Last year at this time, we had 87% of the preliminary final applicant count."

April 7, 2017 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

Thursday, April 6, 2017

More on Judge Gorsuch, plagiarism, and Oxford

Leslie Green, who holds one of the two statutory (i.e., university-wide) Chairs in Philosophy of Law at Oxford, has now expanded on his thoughts about the Gorsuch plagiarism case and the claims of John Finnis (who held a personal chair in legal philosophy, but is now emeritus).  (Earlier posts here and here.)

April 6, 2017 in Jurisprudence, Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

On Judge Gorsuch's plagiarism

In fact, plagiarism is not, contrary to John Finnis, normal practice at Oxford.  This also is irrelevant to his nomination, but the Judge should acknowledge the error.

April 5, 2017 in Jurisprudence, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

Monday, April 3, 2017

Touchy originalists!

Mary Bilder (Boston College) wrote an opinion piece for the Boston Globe about originalism and Judge Gorsuch.  This elicited the following astonishing reply from originalist Larry Solum (Georgetown) on his usually benign and informative Legal Theory Blog.  Some of the questions might have made sense were Solum the referee for a scholarly article making some of these claims; as a response to an op-ed, they are almost comical overreactions.  Take just Solum's first intervention:

Question One: You wrote the following:

Today, most originalists contend that a judge should abide by the text’s “original public meaning” — a term of art that originalist scholars have written thousands of pages trying to explain.

What is the basis for the page count?  Which articles by which originalists scholars are you discussing?  I am very familiar with the theoretical literature on original public meaning, but if this claim is correct there is a large body of work that I have missed entirely.

The basis for the "page count"?  Seriously?  One can look just at Solum's own SSRN page to find at least 400 pages of writing on this topic.  And that's just one author.  Add in Randy Barnett, Keith Whittington, the late Justice Scalia, John McGinnis, Michael Rappaport, Larry Alexander, Will Baude, and Stephen Sachs, and "thousands" seems like a plausible off-the-cuff estimate.  But why quibble about nonsense like this?

I would advise Prof. Bilder to let these questions pass in silence.

UPDATE:  Prof. Solum replies here; I will give him the final word on this matter!

April 3, 2017 in Faculty News, Legal Humor, Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice | Permalink