Friday, April 7, 2017

The latest from LSAC on applicants

"As of 3/31/17, there are 319,072 applications submitted by 47,916 applicants for the 2017–2018 academic year. Applicants are down 1.9% and applications are up 0.3% from 2016–2017.  Last year at this time, we had 87% of the preliminary final applicant count."

April 7, 2017 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

Thursday, April 6, 2017

More on Judge Gorsuch, plagiarism, and Oxford

Leslie Green, who holds one of the two statutory (i.e., university-wide) Chairs in Philosophy of Law at Oxford, has now expanded on his thoughts about the Gorsuch plagiarism case and the claims of John Finnis (who held a personal chair in legal philosophy, but is now emeritus).  (Earlier posts here and here.)

April 6, 2017 in Jurisprudence, Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

On Judge Gorsuch's plagiarism

In fact, plagiarism is not, contrary to John Finnis, normal practice at Oxford.  This also is irrelevant to his nomination, but the Judge should acknowledge the error.

April 5, 2017 in Jurisprudence, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

Monday, April 3, 2017

Touchy originalists!

Mary Bilder (Boston College) wrote an opinion piece for the Boston Globe about originalism and Judge Gorsuch.  This elicited the following astonishing reply from originalist Larry Solum (Georgetown) on his usually benign and informative Legal Theory Blog.  Some of the questions might have made sense were Solum the referee for a scholarly article making some of these claims; as a response to an op-ed, they are almost comical overreactions.  Take just Solum's first intervention:

Question One: You wrote the following:

Today, most originalists contend that a judge should abide by the text’s “original public meaning” — a term of art that originalist scholars have written thousands of pages trying to explain.

What is the basis for the page count?  Which articles by which originalists scholars are you discussing?  I am very familiar with the theoretical literature on original public meaning, but if this claim is correct there is a large body of work that I have missed entirely.

The basis for the "page count"?  Seriously?  One can look just at Solum's own SSRN page to find at least 400 pages of writing on this topic.  And that's just one author.  Add in Randy Barnett, Keith Whittington, the late Justice Scalia, John McGinnis, Michael Rappaport, Larry Alexander, Will Baude, and Stephen Sachs, and "thousands" seems like a plausible off-the-cuff estimate.  But why quibble about nonsense like this?

I would advise Prof. Bilder to let these questions pass in silence.

UPDATE:  Prof. Solum replies here; I will give him the final word on this matter!

April 3, 2017 in Faculty News, Legal Humor, Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice | Permalink

Sunday, April 2, 2017

New York Times Reporter Elizabeth Olson Claims That Professors Earning Less than First Year Associates are Paid like Law Firm Partners (Michael Simkovic)

New York Times reporter Elizabeth Olson recently complained that the Dean of the University of Cincinnati College of Law was suspended after attempting to slash faculty compensation (“Cincinnati Law Dean Is Put on Leave After Proposing Ways to Cut Budget”).  According to Olson, “law schools like Cincinnati [pay hefty] six-figure professor salaries that are meant to match partner-level wages.” 

Olson goes on to cite the compensation of the current and former Dean of the law school.  This makes about as much sense as citing newspaper executive compensation in a discussion about reducing pay for beat reporters.

Data from 2015—the latest readily publicly available—shows that law professors at Cincinnati earned total compensation averaging $133,000.  A few professors earned less than six figures. Only one faculty member—a former dean and one of the most senior members of the faculty—earned more than $180,000.  Including only Full Professors—the most senior, accomplished faculty members who have obtained tenure and typically have between seven and forty years of work experience—brings average total compensation to $154,000 per year.

As Olson herself reported less than a year ago, first year associates at large law firms earn base salaries of $180,000 per year, not counting substantial bonuses and excellent benefits.  With a few years of experience, elite law firm associates’ total compensation including bonus can exceed $300,000.  Law firm partners at the largest 200 firms can earn hundreds of thousands to millions of dollars per year according to the American Lawyer, and often receive large pensions after retirement.

Continue reading

April 2, 2017 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Guest Blogger: Michael Simkovic, Legal Profession, Ludicrous Hyperbole Watch, Weblogs | Permalink

Friday, March 31, 2017

Bureau of Labor Statistics: another strong year for legal employment and incomes

Details here.

March 31, 2017 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

"Justifying Academic Freedom: John Stuart Mill and Herbert Marcuse Revisited"

A new draft paper that may be of interest to some readers; the abstract:

I argue that the core of genuinely academic freedom ought to be freedom in research and teaching, subject to disciplinary standards of expertise. I discuss the law in the United States, Germany, and England, and express doubts about the American view that distinctively academic freedom ought to encompass "extramural" speech on matters of public importance (speakers should be protected from employment repercussions for such speech, but not because of their freedom qua academics).

I treat freedom of academic expression as a subset of general freedom of expression, focusing on the Millian argument that freedom of expression maximizes discovery of the truth, one regularly invoked by defenders of academic freedom. Marcuse argued against Mill (in 1965) that "indiscriminate" toleration of expression would not maximize discovery of the truth. I show that Marcuse agreed with Mill that free expression is only truth- and utility-maximizing if certain background conditions obtain: thus Mill argues that the British colony in India would be better off with "benevolent despotism" than Millian liberty of expression, given that its inhabitants purportedly lacked the maturity and education requisite for expression to be utility-maximizing. Marcuse agrees with Mill that the background conditions are essential, but has an empirical disagreement with him about what those are and when they obtain: Mill finds them wanting in colonial India, Marcuse finds them wanting in capitalist America.

Perhaps surprisingly, Marcuse believes that "indiscriminate" toleration of expression should be the norm governing academic discussions, despite his doubts about the utility-maximizing value of free expression in capitalist America. Why think that? Here is a reason: where disciplinary standards of expertise govern debate, the discovery of truth really is more likely, but only under conditions of "indiscriminate" freedom of argument, i.e., academic freedom. This freedom is not truly "indiscriminate": its boundaries are set by disciplinary competence, which raises an additional question I try to address.

In sum, the libertarians (Mill and Popper) and the Marxists (Marcuse) can agree that academic freedom is justified, at least when universities are genuine sites of scientific expertise and open debate.

March 31, 2017 in Jurisprudence | Permalink

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Next Dean at Berkeley?

Candidates include (at least) Erwin Chemerinsky (UC Irvine), Laura Gomez (UCLA), and Kimberly Yuracko (Northwestern).

March 30, 2017 in Faculty News | Permalink

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

"Naturalism in Legal Philosophy" revised and updated at Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP)

It's also now co-authored with Max Etchemendy, our Law & Philosophy Fellow this year at Chicago.  SEP is a uniquely excellent on-line resource; I commend it to readers looking for high-level introductions to almost any topic in philosophy.

March 29, 2017 in Jurisprudence | Permalink

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Who is paying the defense attorney fees for one of the accused in the Markel murder?

The state wants to know, the defense lawyers don't want to say.  Anyone know how unusual such requests are and what the rules are in Florida governing disclosure?

March 28, 2017 in Faculty News, Of Academic Interest | Permalink | Comments (0)