Tuesday, July 12, 2016

Penn Law (joint with Political Science) hires leading international affairs and human rights scholar Beth Simmons from Harvard

Penn's press release.

July 12, 2016 in Faculty News | Permalink

Cooter & Ulen's famous Law & Econ text is now available for free download...

...from Berkeley.

(Thanks to Dean Rowan for the pointer.)

July 12, 2016 in Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice, Student Advice | Permalink

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Most-Cited Critical Theory Law Faculty, 2010-2014 (inclusive)

This includes faculty who work in critical race theory, feminist legal theory, and critical legal studies (though the latter has been moribund for some time).  Once again, this draws on the data from the 2015 Sisk study:   

Rank

Name

School

Citations

Age in 2016

1

Martha Minow

Harvard University

1160

62

2

Richard Delgado

University of Alabama

  860

76

3

Catharine MacKinnon

University of Michigan

  730

70

4

Kimberle Crenshaw

Columbia University; University of

California, Los Angeles

  650

57

5

Robin West

Georgetown University

  610

62

6

Martha Fineman

Emory University

  580

66

7

Michelle Alexander

Ohio State University

  550

49

8

Angela Harris

University of California, Davis

  540

55

9

Joan Williams

University of California, Hastings

  530

64

10

Jerry Kang

University of California, Los Angeles

  520

48

 

Dorothy Roberts

University of Pennsylvania

  520

60

12

Lani Guinier

Harvard University

  500

66

13

Charles Lawrence

University of Hawaii

  490

73

14

Ian Haney Lopez

University of California, Berkeley

  470

52

15

Devon Carbado

University of California, Los Angeles

  460

50

16

Elizabeth Schneider

Brooklyn Law School

  450

68

17

Randall Kennedy

Harvard University

  430

62

18

Charles Ogletree

Harvard University

  410

64

19

Katharine Bartlett

Duke University

  380

69

20

Katherine Franke

Columbia University

  370

57

   

Runner-up for the top twenty

   
 

Ruth Colker

Ohio State University

  360

60

   

Other highly-cited scholars who work partly in critical theories of law

   
 

Mark Tushnet

Harvard University

1880

71

 

Jack Balkin

Yale University

1710

59

 

Deborah Rhode

Stanford University

1080

64

 

G. Mitu Gulati

Duke University

  860

50

 

July 6, 2016 in Faculty News, Rankings | Permalink

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Number of "highly-cited" law faculty by school

So far, we've covered 15 specialty areas (putting to one side the "ten most-cited list" all of whom showed up elsewhere obviously):   Constitutional & Public Law, Corporate Law & Securities Regulation, Commercial Law, International Law, Administrative and/or Environmental Law, Criminal Law & Procedure, Intellectual Property, Civil Procedure, Property, Tax, Evidence, Law & Economics, Law & Social Science (excluding Economics), Legal History, and Law & Philosophy.   Some more areas will be coming during the summer, but now seems a good time to take a look a the breakdown of faculty affiliations.  Schools differ in faculty size, of course, so I've put them into three rough clusters--the number of ranked faculty (no one was counted twice, even if they appeared more than once) appears in parentheses after the school.  I only listed schools with at least five faculty on the lists.

Schools with roughly 80-100 tenured faculty

New York University (22)

Harvard University (21)

Georgetown University (10)

Schools with roughly 50-65 tenured faculty

Yale University (22)

Columbia University (17)

University of California, Berkeley (15)

University of California, Los Angeles (10)

George Washington University (7)

University of Texas, Austin (7)

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (6)

University of Virginia (5)

Schools with roughly 45 or fewer tenured faculty

University of Chicago (13)

Stanford University (12)

Duke University (9)

University of Pennsylvania (9)

Vanderbilt University (8)

Cornell University (7)

Northwestern University (6)

University of California, Irvine (5)

University of Minnesota (5) 

July 5, 2016 in Faculty News, Rankings | Permalink

Thursday, June 30, 2016

10 Most-Cited Civil Procedure Faculty, 2010-2014 (inclusive) (CORRECTED, June 30)

Once again, drawing on the data from the 2015 Sisk study:   

Rank

Name

School

Citations

Age in 2016

1

Arthur Miller

New York University

1300

82

2

Judith Resnik

Yale University

1060

66

3

Kevin Clermont

Cornell University

  680

71

4

Stephen Burbank

University of Pennsylvania

  580

69

5

Richard Marcus

University of California, Hastings

  490

68

6

Deborah Hensler

Stanford University

  430

74

7

A. Benjamin Spencer

University of Virginia

  390

42

8

James Pfander

Northwestern University

  360

60

9

Scott Dodson

University of California, Hastings

  310

43

 

Linda Mullenix

University of Texas, Austin

  310

66

 

Linda Silberman

New York University

  310

72

 

Runner-up

     
 

Michael Solimine

University of Cincinnati

  300

60

   

Other highly-cited scholars who work partly in this area

   
 

Geoffrey Miller

New York University

1150

66

 

Martin Redish

Northwestern University

1105

71

 

Samuel Issacharoff

New York University

1080

62

 

Pamela Karlan

Stanford University

  830

57

 

Robert Bone

University of Texas, Austin

  700

65

June 30, 2016 in Faculty News, Rankings | Permalink

One benefit of Elsevier taking over SSRN...

...you can now search the full text of papers on SSRN.

June 30, 2016 in Of Academic Interest | Permalink

The "Chicago-Style" article

Finally, a clear explanation of what most of my colleagues are doing!

June 30, 2016 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Faculty News, Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice | Permalink

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

10 Most-Cited Property Faculty, 2010-2014 (inclusive)

Once again, drawing on the data from the 2015 Sisk study: 

Rank

Name

School

Citations

Age in 2016

1

Carol Rose

University of Arizona

710

76

2

Henry Smith

Harvard University

680

51

3

Joseph William Singer

Harvard University

580

62

4

Michael Heller

Columbia University

560

54

5

Vicki Been

New York University

450

60

6

Stewart Sterk

Cardozo Law School/Yeshiva University

400

66

7

Lee Fennell

University of Chicago

390

50

8

Gregory Alexander

Cornell University

360

69

9

Eduardo Penalver

Cornell University

330

45

10

Nestor Davidson

Fordham University

280

49

   

Other highly-cited scholars who work partly in this area

   
 

Thomas Merrill

Columbia University

1590

67

 

Gideon Parchomovsky

University of Pennsylvania

  650

48

 

Lior Strahilevitz

University of Chicago

  440

43

 

Stuart Banner

University of California, Los Angeles

  390

53

 

David Dana

Northwestern University

  350

51

 

June 28, 2016 in Faculty News, Rankings | Permalink

Friday, June 24, 2016

Why The New York Times Should Correct Remaining Factual Errors in Its Law School Coverage

Last week I wrote an open letter to New York Times reporter Noam Scheiber discussing problems with his law school coverage and his reliance on low quality sources such as internet blogs and "experts" who lack relevant expertise rather than peer reviewed labor economics research.  By email, Scheiber insisted that there was nothing wrong with his coverage, but he'd be happy to hear of any specific factual problems I could identify.  

I identified 6 clear factual errors and multiple misleading statements.  I also reinterviewed his lead source, John Acosta and found important discrepancies between how Scheiber depicted Acosta as someone who was suckered into un-repayable debt, while Acosta describes his own situation as hopeful and law school as a worthwhile and carefully researched investment.  New York Times Dealbook reporter and U.C. Berkeley Professor Steven Davidoff Solomon weighed in, citing my research and supporting my points.

Scheiber posted a response to his facebook page, after running it by his editors at the New York Times.  The New York Times agreed to correct the most minor of the six errors I identified. They also "tweaked" two sentences so that the language was less definitive.

Scheiber's response includes some good points (many students from Valparaiso might be below the 25th percentile of law school graduates) as well as strained interpretations of the language of his original article: "fewer" did not actually mean "fewer"'; "Harvardesque" did not actually mean "similar to Harvard."  Scheiber describes my presentation of data that contradicts his factual claims as "strange", "bizarre", "odd", "overly-literal" and (on Twitter) "gripes."   Interestingly, Scheiber thinks that "most law school graduates who pass the bar are going to have at least a few hundred thousand dollars in assets like 401k and home equity by the time they work for 20 years."  This level of savings would make them far more financially secure than the vast majority of the U.S. population.

My response to Scheiber is below.  I explain why The New York Times has an obligation to its readers to correct the remaining uncorrected factual errors in Scheiber's story.

Scheiber embedded his response in my explanation of the 6 clear factual errors in his story, and I in turn embedded my response within his response.  To ease readability, I have color coded Scheiber's response in orange, and my new response in blue.  Scheiber's response is indented once, and my new response is indented twice.  The least indented black text at the beginning of each thread is from the list of 6 clear factual errors, and can be skipped (scroll down until you see orange or blue text) by those who have followed the discussion thus far.

UPDATE: June 25, 2016:  Yesterday, The New York Times posted an additional minor correction to its discussion of taxation of debt forgiveness, stating that debt forgiveness would "probably" be treated as taxable income.  This is an improvement over the original, but could still mislead or confuse readers.  It also leaves many of the most important errors uncorrected.  

Scheiber  tells me that the "tweaks" to the language which he communicated to me in his facebook post from Tuesday 6/21 actually happened on Friday evening 6/17.   This would make them coincide with the timing of my open letter, but before my more detailed explanation of 6 clear factual errors. Scheiber tells me that these "tweaks" were not made in response to my letter, although he has not specified when on Friday evening the changes were made. They appear to have been made after I sent him the letter. 

 

Continue reading

June 24, 2016 in Guest Blogger: Michael Simkovic, Law in Cyberspace, Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Science, Weblogs | Permalink

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

More citations by faculty specialty area coming...

...including civil procedure, property, antitrust, critical race and feminist legal theory, and perhaps a couple of others.

June 22, 2016 in Faculty News, Rankings | Permalink