April 27, 2016

Penn, the new legal history powerhouse on the block

In recent years, Penn has emerged as a force to be reckoned with in the academic market for legal historians.  Two recent Penn JD/PhDs in History, Karen Tani and Greg Ablavsky, have secured tenure-track jobs in the law schools at, respectively, Berkeley and Stanford.  Another Penn PhD in History (with a Harvard JD), Anne Fleming, is now on tenure-track at Georgetown Law.  This year, one of Penn's Sharswood Fellows, a legal historian trained elsewhere, secured a tenure-track job at Vanderbilt Law.

I asked Sarah Barringer Gordon, the distinguished senior legal historian at the University of Pennsylvania, how Penn has been so successful?  She wrote:

Our program is designed to be small and highly selective, and we invest substantial time in each student, and ensure that we support our students financially as well as intellectually.  We take only those candidates that we are confident we can train in the substantive fields of their interest and in a demanding program that is grounded equally in history and law. We also work hard to help our students enter the field as fully minted scholars, who have presented their work in multiple venues, taught, and published. We have an in-house workshop where both faculty and students who work in legal history present their work at early stages, an annual speaker series that brings in outside scholars, and we are active in the American Society for Legal History, as well as a consortium of schools that hosts an annual conference for early career legal historians. One of us also co-edits Studies in Legal History, the oldest and largest book series dedicated to legal history.  Of course, Penn has benefited from the overall success of the field of legal history, and we consider ourselves part of a broader community of scholars that is remarkably collegial.  Our legal historians on the faculty include Wendell Pritchett, Serena Mayeri, Sophia Lee, Bill Ewald, and yours truly.  We are proud to be among the strong programs in legal history, but are also committed to remaining small, as legal historians are built one at a time.

UPDATE:  Another impressive Penn-connected success story is the legal historian Christopher Beauchamp, a Cambridge-trained historian now on tenure-track at Brooklyn Law School (he does not have a law degree).  He was also a Sharswood Fellow at Penn's Law School, as well as a Fellow in Legal History at NYU's Law School, before securing his tenure-track post at Brooklyn.


April 27, 2016 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Faculty News, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

April 26, 2016

Two-year post-docs at the Classical Liberal Institute at NYU Law

My colleague Richard Epstein asked me to share information about these attractive post-docs at his Institute at NYU Law School.  They are open to PhDs in History, Philosophy or Political Science with substantial law interests (a JD is not required).


April 26, 2016 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

Northwestern Law School faculty read "mean" student evaluations

April 25, 2016

Former Berkeley Law Dean Choudhry files formal grievance with UC Berkeley over the attempt to revoke his tenure

Prof. Choudhry's lawyers have shared the grievance letter here:  Download 2016-04-22 Grievance Letter With Exhibits.

I do hope someone in the University of California system will stand up to President Napolitano, whose conduct in this matter is disgraceful.

 


April 25, 2016 in Faculty News, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

April 22, 2016

Book encouraging law students to be happy is latest target for scambloggers (Michael Simkovic)

Professor Paula Franzese of Seton Hall law school is something of a patron saint of law students. Widely known for her upbeat energy, kindness, and tendency to break into song for the sake of helping students remember a particularly challenging point of law, Paula has literally helped hundreds of thousands of lawyers pass the bar exam through her video taped Property lectures for BarBri.

Paula is such a gifted teacher that she won teacher of the year almost ever year until Seton Hall implemented a rule to give others a chance: no professor can win teacher of the year more than two years in a row. Since the rule was implemented, Paula wins every other year. She’s also incredibly generous, leading seminars and workshops to help her colleagues improve their teaching.

Paula recently wrote a book encouraging law students to have a productive, upbeat happy, and grateful outlook on life (A short & happy guide to being a law school student).

Paula’s well-intentioned book has rather bizarrely been attacked by scambloggers as “dehumanizing”, “vain”, “untrustworthy” and “insidious.” The scambloggers are not happy people, and reacted as if burned by Paula’s sunshine. They worry that Paula’s thesis implies that “their failure must be due to their unwillingness to think happy and thankful thoughts.”  

Happiness and success tend to go together. Some people assume that success leads to happiness. But an increasing number of psychological studies suggest that happiness causes success. (here  and here) Happiness often precedes and predicts success, and happiness appears to be strongly influenced by genetic factors.

Leaving aside the question of how much people can change their baseline level of happiness, being happier—or at least outwardly appearing to be happier—probably does contribute to success, and being unhappy probably is a professional and personal liability.

People like working with happy people. They don’t like working with people who are unhappy or unpleasant. This does not mean that people who are unhappy are to blame for their unhappiness, any more than people who are born with disabilities are to blame for being deaf or blind.

But it does raise serious questions about whether studies of law graduates’ levels of happiness are measuring causation or selection. We would not assume that differences between the height of law graduates and the rest of the population were caused by law school attendance, and we probably should not assume that law school affects happiness very much either.

 


April 22, 2016 in Faculty News, Guest Blogger: Michael Simkovic, Law in Cyberspace, Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice, Science, Student Advice, Weblogs | Permalink

April 20, 2016

Harvard Law students demand free tuition as a matter of "financial justice"

Story here.  These students, I fear, do not understand justice.


April 20, 2016 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

Partially on-line JD proposed by Syracuse

April 15, 2016

Maryland's Citron on cyber-harassment...

...in The Guardian.  I still think the crucial move is to repeal Section 230 of the CDA, since it's that provision, more than anything else, that facilitates the vast heaps of garbage that is the internet.


April 15, 2016 in Law in Cyberspace, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

April 14, 2016

Three finalists for the Deanship at Florida State

They are:  Erin O'Hara O'Connor (Vanderbilt), Hari Osofsky (Minnesota), and Heidi Hurd (Illinois).  A strong line up of candidates, as one would expect for a school with a national scholarly profile.  Hurd was a very successful Dean at the University of Illinois, who then got unfairly smeared during an expose of political meddling in admissions.  Kudos to Florida State for correctly assessing what transpired and making her a finalist for their Deanship.


April 14, 2016 in Faculty News, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

April 07, 2016

President Obama is at the University of Chicago Law School today discussing the Supreme Court and the nomination of Judge Garland...

...which you can watch here.  And if you'd like to know the truth about what's really going on with Supreme Court nomination battles, read this.  (I'm not there, I'm at home working, since the faculty have been thrown out of their offices for the day!)


April 7, 2016 in Jurisprudence, Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest | Permalink