May 18, 2016

Twenty Most-Cited Criminal Law & Procedure Faculty in the United States, 2010-2014 (inclusive)

Once again, drawing on the data from the 2015 Sisk study: 

Rank

Name

School

Citations

Age in 2016

1

Orin Kerr

George Washington University

1200

45

2

Paul Robinson

University of Pennsylvania

  790

68

3

Rachel Barkow

New York University

  780

45

4

Christopher Slobogin

Vanderbilt University

  750

65

5

Stephanos Bibas

University of Pennsylvania

  730

47

6

Brandon Garrett

University of Virginia

  640

41

7

Joshua Dressler

Ohio State University

  610

69

8

Michael Tonry

University of Minnesota

  590

71

9

Carol Steiker

Harvard University

  580

58

10

George Fletcher

Columbia University

  560

77

11

Stephen Schulhofer

New York University

  550

74

12

Nancy King

Vanderbilt University

  510

58

13

Samuel Gross

University of Michigan

  500

70

 

Ronald Wright

Wake Forest University

  500

57

15

Franklin Zimring

University of California, Berkeley

  480

74

16

David Sklansky

Stanford University

  470

57

17

Richard McAdams

University of Chicago

  460

56

18

Susan Bandes

DePaul University

  440

65

 

Jeffrey Fagan

Columbia University

  440

70

 

Marc Miller

University of Arizona

  440

57

 

Other highly-cited cholars who work partly in this area

 

   
 

Dan Kahan

Yale University

1110

53

 

Larry Alexander

University of San Diego

  780

73

 

Kent Greenawalt

Columbia University

  660

80

 

Gabriel (Jack) Chin

University of California, Davis

  630

52

 

Michael S. Moore

University of Illinois

  490

73


May 18, 2016 in Faculty News, Rankings | Permalink

Ten Most-Cited Law Faculty in the United States, 2010-2014

This is based on the data collected and published in 2015 by Professor Sisk and colleagues.  I'll be posting additional data about most cited faculty in various areas of scholarship.  But to start, here's the ten most-cited faculty in the academic literature for the years 2010 through 2014 inclusive:

 

Rank

Name

School

Citations

Area(s)

Age in 2016

1

Cass Sunstein

Harvard University

5480

Constitutional, Administrative, Environmental, Behavioral Law & Economics

62

2

Erwin Chemerinsky

University of California, Irvine

2940

Constitutional, Civil Procedure

63

3

Richard Epstein

New York University, University of Chicago

2680

Constitutional, Torts, Law & Economics

73

4

Eric Posner

University of Chicago

2470

Law & Economics, International, Commercial Law, Contracts

51

5

Mark Lemley

Stanford University

2400

Intellectual Property

50

6

William Eskridge, Jr.

Yale University

2180

Constitutional, Legislation

65

7

Mark Tushnet

Harvard University

1880

Constitutional, Legal History

71

8

Akhil Amar

Yale University

1790

Constitutional

58

9

Bruce Ackerman

Yale University

1730

Constitutional

73 

10

Lawrence Lessig

Harvard University

1720

Constitutional, Intellectul Property, Cyberlaw

55

 

 

 


May 18, 2016 in Faculty News, Rankings | Permalink

May 11, 2016

Sarah Lawsky's entry-level hiring report for 2015-16--plus the percentage of successful job seekers from each school

Professor Lawsky (currently UC Irvine, moving this fall to Northwestern) has produced her annual, informative report on rookie hiring this year.  As she notes, it reflects only those who accepted tenure-track jobs, not tenure-track offers.  (This matters for Chicago this year, since two alumni turned down tenure-track offers for personal reasons; as I noted earlier, 75% of our JD and LLM candidates on the market received tenure-track offers.)

Here are the statistics based on the percentage of JD, LLM and SJD (or Law PhD) seekers from each school who accepted a tenure-track position this year (I excluded clinical and LRW jobs, since that market operates differently from the market for "doctrinal" faculty--there were 80 of the latter, as I had estimated--a 20% uptick from recent years, but still about half of the pre-recession numbers); only schools that placed at least two candidates and which had at least nine job seekers* are listed:

1.  University of Chicago (58%: 7 of 12)

2.  Yale University (50%:  21 of 42)

3.  Stanford University (42%:  8 of 19)

4.  Columbia University (29%:  6 of 21)

5.  Harvard University (27%:  12 of 45)

6.  New York University (24%:  7 of 29)

7.  University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (22%:  2 of 9)

8.  University of California, Berkeley (19%:  3 of 16)

9.  University of Virginia (17%:  2 of 12)

UCLA had just five job seekers, but two (40%) got tenure-track jobs.

*I used 9 rather than 10 is the cut-off, since Michigan was just under ten, but still had enough candidates to make the figure somewhat meaningful.


May 11, 2016 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Faculty News, Of Academic Interest, Rankings, Student Advice | Permalink

April 27, 2016

Penn, the new legal history powerhouse on the block

In recent years, Penn has emerged as a force to be reckoned with in the academic market for legal historians.  Two recent Penn JD/PhDs in History, Karen Tani and Greg Ablavsky, have secured tenure-track jobs in the law schools at, respectively, Berkeley and Stanford.  Another Penn PhD in History (with a Harvard JD), Anne Fleming, is now on tenure-track at Georgetown Law.  This year, one of Penn's Sharswood Fellows, a legal historian trained elsewhere, secured a tenure-track job at Vanderbilt Law.

I asked Sarah Barringer Gordon, the distinguished senior legal historian at the University of Pennsylvania, how Penn has been so successful?  She wrote:

Our program is designed to be small and highly selective, and we invest substantial time in each student, and ensure that we support our students financially as well as intellectually.  We take only those candidates that we are confident we can train in the substantive fields of their interest and in a demanding program that is grounded equally in history and law. We also work hard to help our students enter the field as fully minted scholars, who have presented their work in multiple venues, taught, and published. We have an in-house workshop where both faculty and students who work in legal history present their work at early stages, an annual speaker series that brings in outside scholars, and we are active in the American Society for Legal History, as well as a consortium of schools that hosts an annual conference for early career legal historians. One of us also co-edits Studies in Legal History, the oldest and largest book series dedicated to legal history.  Of course, Penn has benefited from the overall success of the field of legal history, and we consider ourselves part of a broader community of scholars that is remarkably collegial.  Our legal historians on the faculty include Wendell Pritchett, Serena Mayeri, Sophia Lee, Bill Ewald, and yours truly.  We are proud to be among the strong programs in legal history, but are also committed to remaining small, as legal historians are built one at a time.

UPDATE:  Another impressive Penn-connected success story is the legal historian Christopher Beauchamp, a Cambridge-trained historian now on tenure-track at Brooklyn Law School (he does not have a law degree).  He was also a Sharswood Fellow at Penn's Law School, as well as a Fellow in Legal History at NYU's Law School, before securing his tenure-track post at Brooklyn.


April 27, 2016 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Faculty News, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

April 26, 2016

Five Law Professors Named 2016 Carnegie Fellows

They are:  Gabriella Blum (Harvard), Curtis Bradley (Duke), Margaret Burnham (Northeastern), Charles Geyh (Indiana), and Nathaniel Persily (Stanford).


April 26, 2016 in Faculty News | Permalink

Northwestern Law School faculty read "mean" student evaluations

April 25, 2016

Former Berkeley Law Dean Choudhry files formal grievance with UC Berkeley over the attempt to revoke his tenure

Prof. Choudhry's lawyers have shared the grievance letter here:  Download 2016-04-22 Grievance Letter With Exhibits.

I do hope someone in the University of California system will stand up to President Napolitano, whose conduct in this matter is disgraceful.

 


April 25, 2016 in Faculty News, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

Corporate Practice Commentator's "Top 10" articles of 2015

The Corporate Practice Commentator is pleased to announce the results of its twenty-second annual poll to select the ten best corporate and securities articles.  Teachers in corporate and securities law were asked to select the best corporate and securities articles from a list of articles published and indexed in legal journals during 2015.  More than 540 articles were on this year’s list.  Because of the vagaries of publication, indexing, and mailing, some articles published in 2015 have a 2014 date, and not all articles containing a 2015 date were published and indexed in time to be included in this year’s list.  Because of ties, there are 12 articles on this year’s list.

The articles, listed in alphabetical order of the initial author, are:

Bartlett, Robert P. III. Do Institutional Investors Value the Rule 10b-5 Private Right of Action? Evidence from Investors' Trading Behavior following Morrison v. National Australia Bank Ltd. 44 J. Legal Stud. 183-227 (2015).

Bebchuk, Lucian, Alon Brav and Wei Jiang. The Long-term Effects of Hedge Fund Activism. 115 Colum. L. Rev. 1085-1155 (2015).

Bratton, William W. and Michael L. Wachter. Bankers and Chancellors. 93 Tex. L. Rev. 1-84 (2014).

Cain, Matthew D. and Steven Davidoff Solomon. A Great Game: The Dynamics of State Competition and Litigation. 100 Iowa L. Rev. 465-500 (2015).

Casey, Anthony J. The New Corporate Web: Tailored Entity Partitions and Creditors' Selective Enforcement. 124 Yale L. J. 2680-2744 (2015).

Coates, John C. IV. Cost-benefit Analysis of Financial Regulation: Case Studies and Implications. 124 Yale L .J. 882-1011 (2015).

Edelman, Paul H., Randall S. Thomas and Robert B. Thompson. Shareholder Voting in an Age of Intermediary Capitalism. 87 S. Cal. L. Rev. 1359-1434 (2014).

Fisch, Jill E., Sean J. Griffith and Steven Davidoff Solomon. Confronting the Peppercorn Settlement in Merger Litigation: An Empirical Analysis and a Proposal for Reform. 93 Tex. L. Rev. 557-624 (2015).

Fried, Jesse M. The Uneasy Case for Favoring Long-term Shareholders. 124 Yale L. J. 1554-1627 (2015).

Judge, Kathryn. Intermediary Influence. 82 U. Chi. L. Rev. 573-642 (2015).

Kahan, Marcel and Edward Rock. Symbolic Corporate Governance Politics. 94 B.U. L. Rev. 1997 (2014).

Velikonja, Urska. Public Compensation for Private Harm: Evidence from the SEC's Fair Fund Distributions. 67 Stan. L. Rev. 331-395 (2015).

----------------------------

The authors represent the following institutions (based on fall 2016 affiliations):  Penn (3), Harvard (3), Berkeley (3), NYU (2), Vanderbilt (2), Columbia (1), Chicago (1), Georgetown (1), Emory (1), and Fordham (1) as well as  the business schools at Duke (1) and Columbia (1).


April 25, 2016 in Faculty News, Rankings | Permalink

April 22, 2016

Book encouraging law students to be happy is latest target for scambloggers (Michael Simkovic)

Professor Paula Franzese of Seton Hall law school is something of a patron saint of law students. Widely known for her upbeat energy, kindness, and tendency to break into song for the sake of helping students remember a particularly challenging point of law, Paula has literally helped hundreds of thousands of lawyers pass the bar exam through her video taped Property lectures for BarBri.

Paula is such a gifted teacher that she won teacher of the year almost ever year until Seton Hall implemented a rule to give others a chance: no professor can win teacher of the year more than two years in a row. Since the rule was implemented, Paula wins every other year. She’s also incredibly generous, leading seminars and workshops to help her colleagues improve their teaching.

Paula recently wrote a book encouraging law students to have a productive, upbeat happy, and grateful outlook on life (A short & happy guide to being a law school student).

Paula’s well-intentioned book has rather bizarrely been attacked by scambloggers as “dehumanizing”, “vain”, “untrustworthy” and “insidious.” The scambloggers are not happy people, and reacted as if burned by Paula’s sunshine. They worry that Paula’s thesis implies that “their failure must be due to their unwillingness to think happy and thankful thoughts.”  

Happiness and success tend to go together. Some people assume that success leads to happiness. But an increasing number of psychological studies suggest that happiness causes success. (here  and here) Happiness often precedes and predicts success, and happiness appears to be strongly influenced by genetic factors.

Leaving aside the question of how much people can change their baseline level of happiness, being happier—or at least outwardly appearing to be happier—probably does contribute to success, and being unhappy probably is a professional and personal liability.

People like working with happy people. They don’t like working with people who are unhappy or unpleasant. This does not mean that people who are unhappy are to blame for their unhappiness, any more than people who are born with disabilities are to blame for being deaf or blind.

But it does raise serious questions about whether studies of law graduates’ levels of happiness are measuring causation or selection. We would not assume that differences between the height of law graduates and the rest of the population were caused by law school attendance, and we probably should not assume that law school affects happiness very much either.

 


April 22, 2016 in Faculty News, Guest Blogger: Michael Simkovic, Law in Cyberspace, Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice, Science, Student Advice, Weblogs | Permalink

April 21, 2016

A big year for law professors at the American Academy of Arts & Sciences

The following law professors were elected to the Academy this year:  Bernard Black (Northwestern), Erwin Chemerinsky (UC Irvine), Liz Magill (Dean, Stanford), Trevor Morrison (Dean, NYU), and Peter Schuck (emeritus, Yale).  In addition, Kim Lane Scheppele (now Princeton, formerly a law professor at Penn) was also elected in the "Law" section of the Academy.  Also elected in other sections of the academy were law professors Jack Knight (Duke), elected in Political Science, and John Monahan (Virginia), elected in Psychology.  In addition, two former law professors were elected in the "Educational Administration" section:  David Leebron, President of Rice University (and formerly a law professor at Columbia), and Joel Seligman, President of the University of Rochester (and formerly a law professor at the University of Michigan and other schools).


April 21, 2016 in Faculty News | Permalink