October 20, 2016

Not much change in number of schools interviewing at FRC from 2015 to 2016

According to Professor Lawsky, there were 86 law schools at the FRC this past weekend in Washington, DC, compared to 89 in 2015.  This doesn't account for the number of slots schools are looking to fill, but my guess is that, like last year, we will see at least 80 new tenure-track academic faculty hired, perhaps a bit higher.

The 94 in 2013 is misleading, since that was a year in which many schools went to the FRC but did no hiring, due to budgetary stresses.  The real contrast, of course, is with the last reasonably good year on the market, 2012-13, when 142 schools participated in the FRC.

October 20, 2016 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Faculty News, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

October 19, 2016

Lateral hires with tenure or on tenure-track, 2016-17


These are non-clinical appointments that will take effect in 2017 (except where noted); I will move the list to the front at various intervals as new additions come in.   (Recent additions are in bold.)  Last year's list is here.


Reuven S. Avi-Yonah (corporate tax, international tax) from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor to the University of California, Irvine.


*Nicolas Cornell (contracts, law & philosophy) from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania to the University of Michigan (law) (untenured lateral).


*Darby Dickerson (higher education law & policy, litigation ethics) from Texas Tech University (where she was Dean) to John Marshall Law School, Chicago (to become Dean).


*Kurt Lash (constitutional law) from the University of Illinois to the University of Richmond.

October 19, 2016 in Faculty News | Permalink

October 12, 2016

New Minnesota Law Dean talks about adjusting to significant application and enrollment declines

October 11, 2016

Hitman Rivera, who took a plea, implicate Wendi Adelson with knowledge of the plot to kill Markel

October 10, 2016

A Nobel Prize in Law?

 It's Nobel Prize season, and Law, like my other field, Philosophy, is not a recognized subject for the prize.  But what if there were a Nobel Prize?  I surveyed my philosophy readers, and came up with ten deserving candidates.  But what about for law?  I've limited this just to those working in the U.S., though there are many deserving candidates in other legal cultures, but I suspect few readers will know enough about them to meaningfully compare (outside jurisprudence, I hardly know enough to even correctly identify plausible candidates).

So which living legal scholar in the U.S. should get a Nobel Prize in Law? We'll rank the top ten.  Have fun!

ADDENDUM:  I hope it goes without saying that there are no doubt errors of omission in the list.  One that has come to my attention, who might have had a shot for the top ten, is Richard Delgado, now at Alabama.  But I fear there will be others.

A LAST ONE:  Some other good suggestions for folks who should have been included:  Elizabeth Warren, Wayne LaFave, Suzanna Sherry, Charles Lawrence.

October 10, 2016 in Faculty News, Rankings | Permalink

October 06, 2016

More from the Blog Emperor on Adelson/Markel

Emperor Caron has been all over this case, it's a good place to go for regular updates.

October 6, 2016 in Faculty News, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

October 04, 2016

One of two murderers-for-hire in Markel killing, Rivera, takes a plea

A promising development, which presumably means some number of Adelsons will soon be arrested.

October 4, 2016 in Faculty News, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

William Baude's "Hamilton"-welcome to the University of Chicago Law School

September 29, 2016

A good, substantive discussion of the Choudhry case at Berkeley and the values of due process that are at stake...

September 27, 2016

Choudhry's lawyers file motion for a preliminary injunction against Berkeley's second disciplinary procedure against him

You can read it here:   Download 2016-09-22 PL Motion in Support of Preliminary Injunction - Doc No 13.

I'm glad they've taken this step.   Berkeley has been out of control in this matter, and needs a federal judge to intervene.

(Thanks to Sam Issacharoff for the pointer.)

September 27, 2016 in Faculty News, Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest | Permalink