April 09, 2016

Percentage of job seekers who secured tenure-track jobs, by school

MOVING TO FRONT FROM MARCH 17--IF YOU'VE BEEN HIRED, PLEASE SUBMIT YOUR INFORMATION AT THE PRAWFS BLOG LINK, BELOW

As Prof. Lawsky collects the data on entry-level hiring, bear in mind that the total number of graduates on the teaching market varies considerably by school; once all the hiring results are in, I'll post the percentage success rates.  But here are the total number of graduates by school that were on the market this year:  45 from Harvard; 42 from Yale; 29 from Georgetown; 29 from NYU; 21 from Columbia; 19 from Stanford; 16 from Berkeley; 12 from Chicago; 12 from Virginia; 10 from Northwestern; 9 from Michigan; 6 from Duke; 5 from Penn; 5 from Cornell; 5 from UCLA; 3 from Southern California; 3 from Texas.  I know that 75% of the Chicago grads on the teaching market secured a tenure-track job; I'll post the final listing in a couple of weeks.

4/9/16 UPDATE:  So as I surmised awhile back, we seem to be closing in on about eighty tenure-track hires this year, compared to about 65 the last two years.  Based on the data so far, here's how the placement looks for the preceding schools that had at least two placements (the data is not yet complete, however; it counts only JD placements, though some of the gross numbers, above, include some LLM or SJDs, though those appear to be distributed across the schools with the biggest numbers--I'll fix that in the final count when Prof. Lawsky is done collecting the data):

Chicago:  6 of 12 candidates secured tenure-track jobs (50%)

UCLA:  2 of 5 candidates secured tenure-track jobs (40%)

Yale    17 of 42 candidates secured tenure-track jobs (40%)

Stanford:  7 of 19 candidates secured tenure-track jobs (37%)

Michigan:  3 of 9 candidates secured tenure-track jobs (33%)

Columbia:  6 of 21 candidates secured tenure-track jobs (29%)

Harvard:  11 of 45 candidates secured tenure-track jobs (24%)

NYU:  7 of 29 candidates secured tenure-track jobs (24%)

Virginia:  3 of 12 candidates secured tenure-track jobs (25%)

Berkeley:  2of 16 candidates secured tenure-track jobs (13%)


April 9, 2016 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Faculty News | Permalink

March 16, 2016

Prawfs entry-level hiring thread is now open

If you've accepted a tenure-track job in a law school for next year, enter your information here.


March 16, 2016 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Faculty News, Of Academic Interest, Rankings | Permalink

February 22, 2016

Triumph of the JD/PhDs

Provocative piece from Bloomberg News, prompted by a recent paper by Lynn LoPucki (UCLA).  We've certainly seen this already in some sub-fields: e.g., first-generation law & economics scholars were almost all JDs, while the current generation are almost all JD/PhDs. The rise in expectations for scholarly writing from junior faculty candidates over the last twenty years has strongly favored those with PhDs, who, of course, have a lot of writing in hand.  And some of this is simply attributable to the revolution in legal scholarship wrought by Richard Posner in the 1970s, which finally finished off the Langedellian paradigm of legal scholarship.

Although I'm quoted saying that the rise of JD/PhDs will continue, that's a descriptive not normative statement.  I think different schools have different missions.  And the relevance of the JD/PhD varies by field.   We have ten current junior faculty, only four of whom are JD/PhDs.  Our Dean is a JD/PhD, our two most recent tenures were one JD/PhD and one JD (who had even been a partner in a major law firm).   We placed three Chicago candidates at "top" law schools this year, two were JD/PhDs, one a "mere" JD.  I think my prediction is an accurate one--and at other top schools it's already come true--but it will be another twenty-five years before it is realized at the top law schools generally.


February 22, 2016 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Faculty News, Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

January 14, 2016

New Fellowship in Behavioral Law & Economics at University of Chicago Law School

 My colleague Jonathan Masur asked that I call the attention of interested readers to a new Fellowship opportunity here at Chicago; he writes: 

The Wachtell Fellowship in Behavioral Law & Economics is designed for aspiring legal academics with research or teaching interests in behavioral law & economics.  Fellows will have have substantial time and resources (including research funding) to pursue their own research.  In addition, Fellows will have the opportunity to teach seminars of their choosing related to behavioral law & economics, present papers at faculty workshops, and participate in conferences.  The Fellowship will run for one year, with an option to renew for a second year.  We are currently accepting applications for fellowships covering the 2016-17 academic year, and we anticipate having one or more openings in subsequent years as well.  Any candidates who are interested in the Fellowship or would like more information are very welcome to email me at jmasur@uchicago.edu.

 To apply, go here.  I'll just note that all our Fellows are thoroughly integrated into the intellectual life of the institution.


January 14, 2016 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

November 30, 2015

Signs of the times: a list of schools that offered retirement incentives and "buyouts" to faculty in recent years

Blog Emperor Caron has a list of schools and links to the stories with details.  It's perhaps worth noting that a number of these schools are now hiring junior faculty this year, indicating that their finances have stabilized, and they are now ready to meet the institutional needs that require full-time faculty.  I expect we will see more of this in the next couple of years, which will contribute to an improved market for new law teachers (I do not expect we will get back to the pre-recession highs of 170 or more new faculty being hired each year, however, but I expect we will get back to 100 or so, from the lows of the last two years, which saw only about 65 new tenure-stream academic faculty hired nationally each year.)


November 30, 2015 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Faculty News, Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

October 08, 2015

UC Irvine's Lawsky on the entry-level hiring market in law schools

September 09, 2015

Teaching statements

An increasing number of schools are now asking candidates to supply "teaching statements."  This is common in many PhD fields, where, of course, the candidates typically have teaching experience.   I'm more doubtful how productive it is on the law teaching market.  But mostly I'm curious what readers, either faculty or candidates (candidates may post with a pseudonym) think should go into such a statement.   Here are some possibilities:  (1) texts you favor for certain subjects, and why; (2) "Socratic" vs. lecture vs. other teaching modalities, why and how you expect to use them; (3) "experiential" components of courses you might use; (4) how your practice experience (or PhD study or other pertinent experience) will factor into your teaching. 

What else?


September 9, 2015 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers | Permalink | Comments (7)

September 08, 2015

NLJ on market for new law teachers

Blog Emperor Caron has some excerpts (it is otherwise behind a paywall).  The chart overstates the hiring, since it includes all faculty appointments, not only tenure-stream academic lines.  My anecdotal impression is that more schools are hiring, and hiring for more positions, this year--we won't get over 100 new hires, but I am guessing we will get to 80 or more (compared to 60 or 65 the last two years).  With the enrollment decline over, schools can now budget for the future and start filling positions that need to be filled.


September 8, 2015 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Faculty News, Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

August 20, 2015

The first FAR distribution: only 410 candidates, down from over 600 about five years ago

Sarah Lawsky (UC Irvine) has the numbers.   In the past, I would estimate that 50% of those in the FAR were non-starters wasting their time and their money.  That percentage has probably gone down with the amount of information easily accessible via the Internet.  But does the drop in total applicants represent the casual/tourist candidates not bothering or does it represent credible, but well-informed candidates deciding to wait in light of the weak market?  I'm not sure.  Here's another data point:  there are roughly 200 candidates in the FAR with JDs or LLMs from Yale, Chicago, Harvard, Stanford, Berkeley, Michigan, Columbia, NYU, and Virginia, to take schools that send sizable numbers into law teaching on a regular basis.  Add in graduates of Cornell, Duke, Georgetown, UCLA, Northwestern, Penn, Southern California, and Texas, and the total rises to about 270.   Not all these candidates are going to turn out to be serious--I'd guess 15-25% of these folks threw their hat in the ring without much consultation or preparation.  If, in fact, there is more hiring this year (my impression so far is that the number of schools hiring is up slightly), then it could turn out to be a good year to be on the teaching market given the overall decline in candidates--but it's too soon to say for sure.


August 20, 2015 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Faculty News, Of Academic Interest | Permalink

August 17, 2015

Packets from job seekers: electronic or hard copy or both?

This is the week that job seekers in law teaching are sending out packets of their materials to the schools they are particularly interested in.  The question often arises whether to send the materials via e-mail or via regular mail or both.  I generally advise both, but I'm curious what readers with experience in hiring think.  (Comments are moderated and may take awhile to appear, so please submit the comment just once and be patient.  Thank you.)


August 17, 2015 in Advice for Academic Job Seekers | Permalink | Comments (6)