Monday, July 31, 2017

Focus group of California lawyers defends tight restrictions on entry into the legal profession (Michael Simkovic)

California is an extreme outlier in the extent to which it restricts entry into the legal profession compared to other U.S. jurisdictions.  Two examples of this include an unusually high minimum cut score on the bar exam and a refusal without exception to permit experienced licensed attorneys from other jurisdictions to be admitted without re-examination.

California lawyers are relatively highly paid, and relatively few in number considering the size of the workforce in California.  Restrictions on entry into the profession may help maintain this status quo.  There are serious questions about whether this protects consumers, or is economic protectionism.  Economic protectionism could benefit California lawyers, but it would likely also harm consumers of legal services by making legal services less available, more expensive and perhaps lower in quality because of reduced competition.  Protectionism would also reduce economic opportunity for those denied the option of practicing law in California, much as immigration restrictions deny economic opportunity to those excluded from high-income countries.

The Supreme Court of California, concerned about the anti-trust implications of a licensed profession establishing criteria for entry, instructed the California State Bar to prepare recommendations on revising the California bar cut score.

Stephen Diamond reports that the California State Bar recommended that its bar examination should either stay the same or be made even harder.  

The California Bar arrived at this conclusion by asking a panel of California lawyers how hard the bar exam should be.  To be more specific, panelists read essays, categorized them into good, medium and bad piles, and, with the assistance of a psychologist who specializes in standardized testing, used this categorization to back-out an extremely high recommended bar passage score.  

Finding that people with high multiple choice scores also tend to write better essays is about as surprising as finding that cars that Consumer Reports rates highly are also often highly rated by J.D. Power.  It's also about as relevant to the policy decision facing the California Supreme Court about minimum competence to practice law.

The relevant question for restricting entry into the legal profession is not whether good (and presumably expensive) lawyers are better than mediocre (and presumably more affordable) lawyers.  Rather, the relevant question is when consumers should be able to decide for themselves whether to spend more for higher quality services or to save money and accept services of lower quality.  Most people will agree that a new Lexus is likely a better, more reliable and safer car than a similar-sized used Toyota.  But this difference in quality does not mean that the government should banish used Toyotas from the roads and permit to drive only those who are willing and able to buy a new Lexus. 

Is there evidence that a bar examinee who would be permitted to practice law in Washington D.C. or New York or Boston or Chicago, but not in California, would routinely make such a mess of clients' affairs that California clients should not even have the option to hire such a lawyer?

Is there evidence that consumers of legal services cannot tell the difference between a good lawyer and a dangerously bad one?  

If these problems exist, could they be addressed by simply requiring lawyers to disclose information to prospective clients that would enable those clients to judge lawyer quality for themselves?  

The California Bar has not yet seriously addressed these questions in arriving at its recommendations.

The California Bar also reported that other states have sometimes recommended increases or decreases to their own bar examination cut score.  But these states are almost all starting with much lower bar cut scores than California's baseline.  It appears that few if any other states recommended bar examination cut scores as high as California's.

http://leiterlawschool.typepad.com/leiter/2017/07/focus-group-of-california-lawyers-defends-extreme-restrictions-on-entry-into-the-legal-profession-in-1.html

Guest Blogger: Michael Simkovic, Legal Profession, Science, Weblogs | Permalink