Brian Leiter's Law School Reports

Brian Leiter
University of Chicago Law School

A Member of the Law Professor Blogs Network

Thursday, October 3, 2013

The Labor Market for Law Professors

This is an empirical study of one year of it (2007-08) by Tracey George (Vanderbilt) and Albert Yoon (Toronto).  It confirms mostly what I would have expected.   This may be particularly noteworthy:

Despite the ink spilled on race and gender in legal academic hiring, we find, with limited exceptions, these factors have little effect.  After controlling for credentials, gender and race do not improve a candidate's chance of getting a screening interview.  The only stage where we find that race and gender have statistically significant effects are at the intermediate call-back interview stage where women and non-whites are statistically significant more likely to be invited for a job talk interview.  But, women and non-whites are no more likely than similarly situated men and whites to get a job offer or, if they get an offer, for the offer to come from a more elite school.

Among the metrics of comparison they look at are publications, fellowships, PhDs, school graduated from, clerkships and so on.  They do err, I think, in taking U.S. News a bit too seriously in viewing one metric as "graduation from Yale, Harvard, Stanford," even though the evidence suggests that while Yale is in a class by itself for teaching placement, the other two are not.  I've urged Professor Yoon to include some data on Chicago, Columbia, and Michigan, at least.  (Of course, this was only one year, and it is possible that the data for this one year do support the grouping.  In any case, hopefully the final version of the paper will include more evidence in support of the grouping.)

http://leiterlawschool.typepad.com/leiter/2013/10/the-labor-market-for-law-professors.html

Advice for Academic Job Seekers, Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest, Professional Advice, Rankings, Student Advice | Permalink