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January 8, 2012

"Leiter Reports"

That's the title of this interview with a Paris-based magazine (but one mostly written by Brits), but which several of my law colleagues here and elsewhere found interesting--it's mostly about philosophical topics, but also some jurisprudential ones.  In any case, I hope it might interest some readers.  The interviewer was extremely well-informed; it was easily the most rewarding interview I ever gave.

Posted by Brian Leiter on January 8, 2012 in Jurisprudence, Of Academic Interest | Permalink | TrackBack

January 6, 2012

In Memoriam: Robert Fletcher

Professor Bob Fletcher, a retired faculty member at the University of Washington, the husband of retired Ninth Circuit Judge Betty Fletcher, and father of Ninth Circuit Judge William Fletcher, died last week.  He was 93.  He was an active member of the UW faculty from 1956-89 and later taught at Hastings, Seattle, and Vermont.  

Posted by Dan Filler on January 6, 2012 in Memorial Notices | Permalink | TrackBack

More on NY Times Reporting on Law Schools: The Case of Duncan Law School

The plot thickens.

Posted by Brian Leiter on January 6, 2012 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest | Permalink | TrackBack

January 5, 2012

In Memoriam: Daniel H. Benson

On December 28, 2011, Professor Dan Benson passed away.  He served on the Texas Tech law faculty from 1973 until 2004, and continued teaching after retirement up until his death.  Benson taught in the area of criminal law.  He was 75.

Posted by Dan Filler on January 5, 2012 in Memorial Notices | Permalink | TrackBack

January 4, 2012

If law schools took the medical school model seriously

A very interesting comment from Matt Spitzer (Texas), the former Dean at USC, over at Dean Rodriguez's new blog:

Much of the current disenchantment stems from the enormous economic downturn and attendant layoffs and failure-to-hires of recent law school graduates. This produces a demand for both better information about placement (and, perhaps, bar passage), as well as heartfelt but unfocused requests for training that will enable graduates to function as lawyers. If and when the economy improves, these feelings will not disappear, but will become less intense. To the extent that we take the latter request seriously, it will not lead, by and large, to doing a lot more public interest work. Although that work may produce some generalized skills training (e.g. how to draft a complaint), there is precious little paid work in public interest. Rather, taking the demand for skill seriously leads down a path to law schools having a law firm (just as medical schools have hospitals) where students start to learn how to practice under lawyer-professors, who both provide training and who charge clients for their services. We would need to work hard to make the position of lawyer-professor prestigious, so that we could attract the best and the brightest. Law school might become 4 years instead of 3. And there will be negotiations between the lawyer-professors and the Deans of law schools about how to split fees. Deans of law schools will need new sets of skills, akin to managing partner at a large law firm.

Posted by Brian Leiter on January 4, 2012 in Legal Profession, Of Academic Interest | Permalink | TrackBack

January 3, 2012

Northwestern Dean Dan Rodriguez Has a Blog!

This is, I believe, a first for a Dean of an elite law school!  I gather it's fairly common among Deans of elite business schools.  The wave of the future?

Posted by Brian Leiter on January 3, 2012 in Of Academic Interest | Permalink | TrackBack

January 2, 2012

The best philosophy programs

Some readers might be interested in the report on Anglophone graduate programs in philosophy I orchestrate (and which is published by Blackwell), which is based on surveys of more than 300 philosophers around the world.  The most recent edition was released last month.  As you'll see, while some top philosophy departments are at universities with top law schools, many are not.

Posted by Brian Leiter on January 2, 2012 in Of Academic Interest, Rankings | Permalink | TrackBack